How to Spot Fake News. The Basics.

November 21, 2017

Fake_News

Survival tips for the attack on democracy. Worth circulating.

International Federation of Library Associations:

Critical thinking is a key skill in media and information literacy, and the mission of libraries is to educate and advocate its importance.

Discussions about fake news has led to a new focus on media literacy more broadly, and the role of libraries and other education institutions in providing this.

When Oxford Dictionaries announced post-truth was Word of the Year 2016, we as librarians realise action is needed to educate and advocate for critical thinking – a crucial skill when navigating the information society.

IFLA has made this infographic with eight simple steps (based on FactCheck.org’s 2016 article How to Spot Fake News)  to discover the verifiability of a given news-piece in front of you. Download, print, translate, and share – at home, at your library, in your local community, and on social media networks. The more we crowdsource our wisdom, the wiser the world becomes.

Download the infographic

Translations

  • Español (Spanish) [PDF] | [JPG]
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  • Deutsch (German) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Русский (Russian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • 中文 (Chinese) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • العربية (Arabic) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • বাংলা (Bengali) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Български (Bulgarian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Hrvatski (Croatian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Čeština (Czech) [coming soon]
  • 中文 (Chinese – Traditional Characters) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Dansk (Danish) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Nederlands (Dutch) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Eesti (Estonian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Suomi (Finnish) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Ελληνικά (Greek) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • עִברִית (Hebrew) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Magyar (Hungarian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Íslenska (Icelandic) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Bahasa Indonesia (Indonesian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Italiano (Italian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • 한국어 (Korean) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • 日本語 (Japanese) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Latviešu (Latvian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Lietuvių kalba (Lithuanian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Norsk bokmål (Norwegian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Norsk nynorsk (Norwegian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Polski (Polish) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Português (Portuguese) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Românește (Romanian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Cрпски (Serbian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • af Soomaali (Somali) [coming soon]
  • Svenska (Swedish) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Türkçe (Turkish) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Українська (Ukrainian) [PDF] | [JPG]
  • Tiếng Việt (Vietnamese) [coming soon]
  • Cymraeg (Welsh) [PDF] | [JPG]

 

 

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5 Responses to “How to Spot Fake News. The Basics.”


  1. I can’t like this blog for some reason… so I’m liking it in the comment section…

  2. webej Says:

    “Fake News” is simply a temporary fad.
    -There has always been incorrect reporting.
    -Bullshit has always existed.
    -And misinformation has always been fed into the news cycle by the powers that be and others who manage to insinuate themselves into public discourse.

    Fake News is a self-referential meme — it is itself “Fake News”. It is a bogus ploy by the MSM and government spokesmen to recoup the authority they have deservedly lost.

    A perfect example was PetroCan. Always portrayed (since the seventies) by the MSM as another government boondoggle, a white elephant, a waste of tax-payer money. In fact they discovered more new oil than the big multinationals combined; they were highly profitable; they gave government policy leverage over the rest of the oil industry. Sold in 2009 (because of current neo-liberal ideology) because they were one of the few crown corporations attractive enough to be able to sell at all without imminent liquidation.


  3. […] From Climate Denial Crock of the Week […]


  4. […] program involving students, and I saw this posted in a classroom just the other day; this morning I found it on Peter W. Sinclair’s very wonderful Climate Crocks blog which battles the scourge of climate change denialism. I think it’s an extremely important […]


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