Republicans Wobbly on Climate

December 18, 2019


Long after Hitler and Stalin are forgotten, the Republican Party will still be remembered as the most monstrous criminals in the history of Mankind.
Too late for them, but we’ll take what we can get.

Above, Ted Cruz remains true to form as a troglodyte denier, telling us “What is dangerous about the climate movement..”

Houston Chronicle:

WASHINGTON – For years, Republicans have questioned humans’ contribution to climate change, casting doubt on the well-established scientific conclusion that greenhouse gas emissions from burning oil and other fossil fuels are causing the planet to warm dangerously.

But as Democrats push the issue further into the spotlight, more and more House Republicans are themselves calling for action on climate change – even in oil rich states like Texas – raising the prospect the party is shifting after a decade-long stalemate on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

The change in tone was on display at a hearing in the House Energy and Commerce Committee earlier this month, when one Republican after another said climate change was a problem. The committee’s top Republican, Rep. Greg Walden of Oregon, and Rep. John Shimkus, R-Ill., wrote a letter to Democrats asking that “the committee work together to find bipartisan climate solutions.”

It was enough to catch the attention of one of the witnesses at the hearing, Rich Powell, executive director at ClearPath, a political group advocating for conservative approaches to reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

“Everyone was saying this is real, its human caused by industrial activity and we need to get on board finding a solution,” he said. “It’s a pretty significant evolution of the conversation.”

The prospect of a Republican shift on climate comes amid increasingly dire forecasts of rising oceans and crop failures, with scientists warning governments must take action immediately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. Such a move would likely drastically slash demand for fossil fuels like oil, a centerpiece of Texas’s economy, inciting fierce partisan battles on Capitol Hill that have so far brought any attempt at a legislative solution to a halt.

Below, Congressman Dan Crenshaw, mentioned above, gives a summary of GOP solutions to climate, which include, surprise, fracking.

Houston Chronicle continues:

Republican interest in climate change is not unique, just infrequent. Former Republican presidential nominee John McCain called for “mandatory reductions” in greenhouse gas emissions during his 2008 campaign. Former Republican secretaries of state James Baker and George Shultz have pressed Congress to adopt a tax on greenhouse gas emissions, with proceeds going back to taxpayers through a dividend check.

Such moderate points of view appear to be trickling down into the ranks of the party. In the last Congress, a caucus on climate change counted 45 Republican House members.

“People focus on the most ardent deniers who just parrot the conservative line,” said Frank Maisano, a Washington media consultant whose clients include fossil fuel companies. “But there are plenty of Republicans saying, ‘I don’t necessarily believe what the climate groups believe, but I’m not saying this isn’t serious.’”

Public skepticism on climate is becoming more difficult to maintain politically, as more Americans believe climate change needs to be addressed – 60 percent now say they are “alarmed” or “concerned,” according to a survey by Yale University.

Rep. Bill Flores, R-Waco, was long among the skeptics. During his 2012 re-election campaign he described the climate change movement as “petty politics based on dubious ‘agenda-driven, scientific’ research.”

Nowadays, Flores can be found telling other members of the House Energy committee about the solar system he installed on his roof – “the largest residential solar system in central Texas” – and advocating for a market-driven approaches to climate change such as investing in batteries and other clean energy technology rather than regulating emissions.

“I have become much more knowledgeable about this particular policy issue than I was before,” Flores said in an interview. “I’m excited about the opportunities for America to be a leader in emissions reductions. We just need to make sure we get the policy right, then let American know how and ingenuity get us there.”

Other Republican members of Texas’s congressional delegation, including Senators John Cornyn and Ted Cruz, declined to be interviewed for this story. But Flores is hardly alone among Texas politicians speaking out on climate.

Since progressive Democrats began pushing the creation of a “Green New Deal,” to rapidly shift the U.S. economy from fossil fuels through massive government spending on renewable energy, Republicans in Washington have been quick to denounce the method, but not the aim.

In a speech on the Senate floor last week, Cornyn said, “People think about Texas, they think about oil and gas, but we believe in all of the above. I actually think moving toward cleaner and renewable energy is a good thing.”

But advocating for clean energy is a long way from voting for legislation, such as carbon taxes or tougher environmental laws, that would reduce demand for fossil fuels. And with President Donald Trump in the White House, who has repeatedly questioned government assessments of the national security threat posed by climate change, most in Washington expect any substantial change in the law to be years off, if not more.

“It’s a baby step forward. It’s just a baby step,” Tiernan Sittenfeld, senior vice president of government affairs at the League of Conservation Voters, said of Republicans’ acknowledgment of climate change. “This is a massive problem and we need big comprehensive solutions. But at the same time we still have [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell, a climate denier, and the most anti-environment president we’ve ever had.”
But advocating for clean energy is a long way from voting for legislation, such as carbon taxes or tougher environmental laws, that would reduce demand for fossil fuels. And with President Donald Trump in the White House, who has repeatedly questioned government assessments of the national security threat posed by climate change, most in Washington expect any substantial change in the law to be years off, if not more.
“It’s a baby step forward. It’s just a baby step,” Tiernan Sittenfeld, senior vice president of government affairs at the League of Conservation Voters, said of Republicans’ acknowledgment of climate change. “This is a massive problem and we need big comprehensive solutions. But at the same time we still have [Senate Majority Leader] Mitch McConnell, a climate denier, and the most anti-environment president we’ve ever had.”

2 Responses to “Republicans Wobbly on Climate”

  1. dumboldguy Says:

    Viewing ANY appearance by Ted Cruz is enough to make one puke. It’s like expecting to pour out Cheerios into your breakfast cereal bowl and having dog turds, dead mice, and live cockroaches come out of the box instead. The term “LYING POS” was coined to describe him.

    But doesn’t he present a MANLY appearance with his pussy facial hair and his cowboy boots? Think he drives a big honking pickup with a set of longhorns on the hood and a gun rack in the rear window? He, along with Mitch McConnell, is one of the Repugnants who make me want to hit them (and most of the others come from TX or OK also—why is that?). Do you think I could wear a Trump wig and mask and belly padding and get away with slapping them around? Maybe if I did it on 5th. avenue in NYC?

    Crenshaw, on the other hand, is actually more fittingly described as “wobbly”—-that’s probably because he likely gets most of his campaign $$$ from the fossil fuel interests, the natural gas folks especially. Just more politics in America, folks—-lie for whoever gives you $$$—-even Democrats have been known to do it, although they don’t deny science very much.

  2. dumboldguy Says:

    “Long after Hitler and Stalin are forgotten, the Republican Party will still be remembered as the most monstrous criminals in the history of Mankind”.

    Anyone who has just watched the insane and incredible speeches made by the various Repugnants at the impeachment proceedings will agree with that statement.


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