Houston, You have a ..Glub..glub..glub…

May 10, 2019

Houston is having hurricane style flooding without a hurricane this week.

It’s hard to imagine how the city continues as normal if it’s going to be hit like this regularly. How many 500+ year rainstorms has it had in the last 5 years?

Above, for review, impacts of Hurricane Harvey on Houston make a good object lesson in climate change dynamics.

Washington Post:

In a week that has already seen Houston and surrounding areas in Southeast Texas face some of the most severe rainfall since Hurricane Harvey, heavy storms again pounded the city late Thursday, leaving at least three bayous flowing over the top of their banks, nearly 90,000 residents without power and dozens reportedly trapped for a time in floodwater on Interstate 10.
The Thursday night storm continues a week of flooding in a city where the fallout from the historic 2017 hurricane is still being felt. Harris County meteorologist Jeff Lindner told the Houston Chronicle that more than three inches fell in most areas of Houston, but one area far east of Houston got nailed with four inches in 30 minutes. Some areas expected to see up to six inches of rain, the Chronicle reported.

Houston Chronicle:

Harris County saw widespread rainfall between 1 and 7 inches overnight, according to the Harris County Flood Warning System. More heavy rainfall is expected to hit the area on Saturday and subside on Sunday.

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6 Responses to “Houston, You have a ..Glub..glub..glub…”

  1. jimbills Says:

    Most of Texas has been super wet this spring. I’m in Dallas, and it’s very, very strange to say you’re tired of the rain here, but dayumn.

    Houston has also been in the news lately for multiple chemical plant explosions:

    https://abc13.com/13-investigates-as-tank-fire-rages-answers-incomplete/5203800/

    https://www.chron.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/What-we-know-about-the-Crosby-chemical-fire-13737671.php#photo-17163576

    So, fun place to live.

    • rhymeswithgoalie Says:

      [Confession: I am a big big fan of Chemical Safety Board videos.]

      Those are examples of problems from chronically sloppy site management.

      Here’s an example where a company pretty much conscientiously followed site safety procedures under challenging conditions, only to succumb to extraordinary flooding conditions.

    • rsmurf Says:

      Im in Dallas also. For year to date in Dallas, about 15″ average thru may is 16 or so. Last year we had 3 months feb, sep, oct all over 10 inches, thats about our yearly average in 3 months and most of that came in about 3 weeks. I thought droughts would be our downfall after we went 5 years where every lake in Texas was dangerously low, but flooding may be what gets us. Houston might be better off washing into the ocean, that is one of the nastiest, dirty filthy places I have ever been, and that includes all the water and the gulf!

  2. rhymeswithgoalie Says:

    After the deaths from Austin’s 1981 Memorial Day floods, the city enacted and enforced flood management requirements. There are giant catch basins for parking lots, low-lying parks designated for flooding and limits on impervious cover throughout the city.

    The Greater Houston Metro area doesn’t have the political coherence to address the problem of aggravated subsidence, overpaving, and increasing rainfall, even after the [then-]record rains of 2001 led to the drowning of a woman in a garage parking elevator.

  3. Terry Donte Says:

    Houston built a whole lot of homes and houses in a flood plain, a known flood plain without any dikes or pumping stations and when it flooded the first, second and third time etc over the last 100 years refused to build those dikes and pumping stations.

    Houston sits on a flat flood plain for the most part, It needs to do the same thing the Netherlands did, build dikes and pumping stations. If they did that there would be no flooding and we would not have to listen to stories of doom and gloom.


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