Poll: Green New Deal is Wildly Popular

December 18, 2018

green_new

Click for Larger

Yale Program on Climate Communications:

Some members of Congress are proposing a “Green New Deal” for the U.S. They say that a Green New Deal will produce jobs and strengthen America’s economy by accelerating the transition from fossil fuels to clean, renewable energy. The Deal would generate 100% of the nation’s electricity from clean, renewable sources within the next 10 years; upgrade the nation’s energy grid, buildings, and transportation infrastructure; increase energy efficiency; invest in green technology research and development; and provide training for jobs in the new green economy.

While the Green New Deal has been a fixture of the post-election news cycle, and at least 40 members of Congress (to date) have endorsed the idea, little is known about the American public’s support for or opposition to it. To inform this question, we surveyed a nationally-representative sample of registered voters in the United States.

In the survey, we showed respondents a brief description of the Green New Deal, which was identical to the first paragraph of this report (above). The description was followed by the question “How much do you support or oppose this idea?”

The survey results show overwhelming support for the Green New Deal, with 81% of registered voters saying they either “strongly support” (40%) or “somewhat support” (41%) this plan.

Gizmodo:

The Green New Deal is popping. New polling released on Friday by the Yale Program on Climate Change Communication shows that 81 percent of respondents across the political spectrum support the progressive plan to combat climate change by rapidly weaning the U.S. off fossil fuels.

The findings are stunning but also come with a couple caveats, namely that most people haven’t heard much about the Green New Deal, and they may not know of its connection to incoming representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, a bete noire in the right wing fever swamps. Still, the fact that the idea enjoys broad support in a semi-vacuum shows that before Americans descend into their political bunkers, progressive policies are actually quite popular.

The Green New Deal is a set of aspirational goals in line with the best available climate science. Among those goals are switching the U.S. electrical grid to 100 percent renewable energy by 2030, improving energy efficiency, and setting up policies for a green jobs guarantee while planning a just transition for fossil fuel workers as they move into new economic sectors. If it sounds good to you, you’re not alone.

The new polling numbers (which are based on online polling of 966 registered voters) show that 81 percent of respondents support this idea either “somewhat” or “strongly”. That includes 92 percent of Democrats, 88 percent of Independents, and even 64 percent of Republicans. The numbers are markedly higher than similar polling done by progressive think tank Data for Progress earlier this year. There’s no set plan for how to get there, but that’s why groups like the Sunrise Movement and Justice Democrats have been lobbying for Democratic leadership in the House to setup a select committee to create that plan.

Yale again:

As expected, support is strongest among Democrats (92%). But a large majority of Republicans (64%) – including conservative Republicans (57%) – also support the policy goals in our description of the Green New Deal.

Notably, although our description of the Deal accurately provided details about the proposal, it did not mention that the Green New Deal is championed by Democratic members of Congress such as Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-NY) and John Lewis (D-GA). Other research has shown that people evaluate policies more negatively when they are told it is backed by politicians from an opposing political party. Conversely, people evaluate the same policy more positively when told it is backed by politicians from their own party.

Therefore, these findings may indicate that although most Republicans and conservatives are in favor of the Green New Deal’s policies in principle, they are not yet aware that this plan is proposed by the political Left. For any survey respondents who were previously unaware of the Deal, it is likely that their reactions have not yet been influenced by partisan loyalty.

Anticipating and making the public aware of potential arguments that may be used against the Green New Deal may also help maintain public support for it. In contrast, partisan framing in communicating about the Green New Deal – by either the Right or the Left – could activate partisan associations and erode the existing bipartisan support for the concept.

 

Advertisements

4 Responses to “Poll: Green New Deal is Wildly Popular”

  1. dumboldguy Says:

    Good news as far as it goes—-unfortunately, we can expect the Repugnants to move more heavily into “oppose” land once the details of the plan become better understood. It’s just the nature of the beast.

  2. rsmurf Says:

    Proof republicans are still in the Stone Age!

  3. rsmurf Says:

    The most troubling thing is 81% strongly or somewhat support, yet we have no action. Looks like disinformation, and or corporations blocking is the problem.


Leave a Reply to dumboldguy Cancel reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: