Push Back on Catastrophic “Tax Reform” – Disaster for Democracy, and the Climate

December 1, 2017

emergency

The “Tax Reform” bill currently being considered by the US Senate, is so far-reaching and contains so many poorly understood and dangerous provisions, not just for taxes, but for state law, women’s rights, voting rights, renewable energy, judges and the courts – that it threatens to change the character of US democracy.

Last night the vote was postponed, as several key Senators are still wavering.
Both Senators in my state are firmly against, but if you are a resident of one of the states below, now is the time to contact your Senator.

Here are their DC office phone numbers: Arizona – John McCain (202) 224-2235,
Wisconsin – Ron Johnson (202) 224-5323, Montana – Steve Daines (202) 224-2651, Maine – Susan Collins (202) 224-2523, Alaska – Lisa Murkowski (202) 224-6665, Tennessee – Bob Corker (202) 224-3344, Colorado – Jeff Flake (202) 224-4521, Oklahoma – James Lankford (202) 224-5754, Florida – Marco Rubio (202) 224-3041, Kansas –  Jerry Moran (202) 224-6521.

 

New York Times:

Republican leaders ended Thursday with the same problem they started with: They still need to secure 50 votes to be able to pass their tax bill.

Their effort appeared to be gaining momentum on Thursday, with talk of a final vote later that night or early Friday.

But by the end of the day, they were contending with twin setbacks, both involving how the bill would affect federal budget deficits.

The congressional Joint Committee on Taxation said in an analysis released on Thursday afternoon that the legislation would add $1 trillion to federal budget deficits over a decade, even after accounting for economic growth.

In addition, a provision meant to prevent ballooning deficits ran into parliamentary problems. The provision would have increased taxes if economic growth fell short of expectations, but it was deemed by the Senate parliamentarian to run afoul of budget rules that must be followed if the bill is to be shielded from a Democratic filibuster.

Without the so-called trigger, the votes of a handful of Republicans, including Senator Bob Corker of Tennessee, appeared at risk.

“Senator Corker has been pretty clear he doesn’t want any deficit spending,” Senator John Cornyn, Republican of Texas, said on Thursday, adding that he did not agree with the Joint Committee on Taxation’s assessment.

To pass the tax bill in the Senate, Republican leaders can lose only two of their members, assuming Democrats are unified against the measure.

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