Will 2018 be the Year of EVs?

November 20, 2017

This week saw the rollout of Tesla’s newest Semi-Truck and Roadster offerings.
The Economist has a video with a warts and all look at the inevitable EV revolution.
Challenges galore, but obstacles keep falling.

Here, Dan Kammen of UC Berkeley has some important drill-down perspectives.

Tesla is the glamour company now, but challengers are rising, below.

 

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8 Responses to “Will 2018 be the Year of EVs?”


  1. […] Distinguished Professor of Energy at University of California Dan Kammen, interviewed in December 2016 by Peter Sinclair. More at Will 2018 be the Year of EVs? Will 2018 be the Year of EVs? […]

  2. Gingerbaker Says:

    Here in the U.S., EV’s will remain only a partial option for two-car families only.

    The plain fact of the matter is that even the Tesla charging station infrastructure is inadequate for a true one-car solution. And Tesla’s charging system is vastly better than anything else.

    And, as far as I can tell, *nobody* is stepping up to the plate in the U.S. and addressing the pathetic state of charging infrastructure. The crooks in office now, the entire Republican party have zero plans to do anything. 99% of the Democrats have zero plans to do anything.

    The charging system we have now was paid at least partially with grant money that has already run out.

    Words get spoken, though. The NY state gov made beautiful, powerful, courageous words about putting chargers in all upstate Interstate rest stops. Then, someone actually asked what the timetable was for this modest goal. More words got spoken – vague words about “several years from now” were spoken.

    The Chevy Bolt has been the highest-selling EV in the U.S. for months. Chevy idled the factory which makes them. They raised the price in Europe by more than 5,000 euros and then told European dealers not to expect any more shipments for the time being. Chevy Volt sales have fallen off to almost nil. They are not offering extremely attractive leasing rates on them.

    The new Chrysler Pacifica plug-in hybrid goes 30 miles full electric. They are selling briskly indeed. Interestingly, though, Chrysler does not even mention that it is a plug-in! For them, it is just a “hybrid”.

    The Koch brothers promised the world they were going to put the kibosh on electric cars. Looks like their plans are working. The Repugnants are getting rid of the $7500.00 EV rebate, and Tesla has been having mysterious production problems with suppliers.

  3. J4Zonian Says:

    One of the usual lies went unanswered in the first video, only partly answered in the 2nd.

    ”Recent research by the Union of Concerned Scientists found that driving and charging an electric vehicle anywhere in the United States produces fewer global warming emissions than driving an average new gas-powered vehicle. Furthermore, the research shows that more than two-thirds of Americans live in areas where driving an average electric vehicle is better for the planet than even the most efficient hybrid vehicle on the market.”
    http://www.ucsusa.org/publications/catalyst/winter16-electric-vehicles-just-how-green-are-they#.WdJdxkyZO2w

    map: http://www.ucsusa.org/sites/default/files/styles/embedded_original/public/images/2016/02/winter16-electric-vehicles-cleaner-choice.gif?it

  4. Jerry Falwel Says:

    lets pretend the EV is 100 percent. Where is the power coming from to charge the cars? we would need to double or triple our power plants to recharge the cars and trucks. Solar and wind would not work without some way to store power and currently that is not possible without spending hundreds of trillions on batteries.

    • J4Zonian Says:

      A geology professor defined a dense, even impervious conglomeration of earthen material as a clod.

      • Gingerbaker Says:

        We are going to need an astrophysicist to properly describe the intense obtuse black hole-like density of Jerry Trollwel.

        • J4Zonian Says:

          Excellent.

          We run into that black hole of denial a lot, don’t we? It’s inevitable; to deny something as central and obvious as climate catastrophe or evolution one is subject to an ever-expanding black hole of unawareness, as one has to deny not only all kinds of obvious facts, but the denial itself, and then the denial of the denial, and so on. It just keeps sucking in more of one’s life as one tries to protect the conscious mind from awareness of everything one knows unconsciously.

          I’ve also come to think of the energy of fossil fuels as black energy–Jungian shadow that reflects and manifests the worst aspects of our fear, rage, grief, desire, etc.

          Writing to sheilach I was trying to tie that idea in to the black hole, and the idea of a reversed graph of peak oil as a black pit of despair we’re now clawing our way out of. All these seem related as a sort of mythical/dream-like complex we’re stuck in (actually more nightmare than dream). Don’t quite have a handle on expressing the connection yet…


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