Dumber and Dumber. More from Trump Enviro Pick

November 9, 2017

Senators play with Kathleen Hartnett White, Trump appointee to Council on Environmental Quality.

Like baffling a cat with a laser pointer.

SplinterNews:

Kathleen Hartnett White, who was nominated to lead the White House’s Council on Environmental Quality, tried and failed to defend her denial of climate change during a Senate confirmation hearing for the position on Wednesday.

During the hearing, Sen. Ben Cardin, a Democrat from Maryland, bluntly asked Hartnett White if she believed in climate change. “I am uncertain,” she answered before realizing she was clearly off script. “No, I’m not. I jumped ahead. Climate change is of course real.” Hm. It sure sounds like Hartnett White was coached to acknowledge climate change, but question its causes. Scott Pruitt, current Environmental Protection Agency administrator, pulled a similar stunt during his confirmation hearing.

Hartnett White also confirmed that she wasn’t a scientist, which seems to be a theme amongst hopeful Trump administration environmental and agricultural appointees. “I’m not a scientist, but in my personal capacity I have many questions that remain unanswered by current climate policy,” Hartnett White told Cardin. “I think we indeed need to have more precise explanation of the human role and the natural role.”

whitehouse

Senator Merkeley – “Which of these bars is the highest?”

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7 Responses to “Dumber and Dumber. More from Trump Enviro Pick”

  1. painedumonde Says:

    Whiskey. Tango. Foxtrot.


  2. Meanwhile back at the ranch where Tonto .
    Sorry wrong script
    https://oilvoice.com/Press/10309/New-Study-100-Renewable-Electricity-Worldwide-is-Feasible-and-More-CostEffective-than-the-Existing-System-

    New Study: 100% Renewable Electricity Worldwide is Feasible and More Cost-Effective than the Existing System

    Posted by OilVoice Press – OilVoice

    The results of the study are revealing: A global electricity system fully based on renewable energy is feasible at every hour throughout the year and is more cost effective than the existing system, which is largely based on fossil fuels and nuclear energy.

    Existing renewable energy potential and technologies, including storage can generate sufficient and secure power to cover the entire global electricity demand by 2050[1]. Total levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) on a global average for 100% renewable electricity in 2050 is €52/MWh (including curtailment, storage and some grid costs), compared to €70/MWh in 2015.

    “A full decarbonization of the electricity system by 2050 is possible for lower system cost than today based on available technology. Energy transition is no longer a question of technical feasibility or economic viability, but of political will”, Christian Breyer, lead author of the study, LUT Professor of Solar Economy and Chairman of the EWG Scientific Board said.

    A transition to 100% renewables would bring greenhouse gas emissions in the electricity sector down to zero and drastically reduce total losses in power generation. It would create 36 million jobs by 2050, 17 million more than today.

    ”There is no reason to invest one more Dollar in fossil or nuclear power production”, EWG President Hans-Josef Fell said. “Renewable energy provides cost-effective power supply. All plans for a further expansion of coal, nuclear, gas and oil have to be ceased. More investments need to be channeled in renewable energies and the necessary infrastructure for storage and grids. Everything else will lead to unnecessary costs and increasing global warming.”

    The key findings of the study:

    Existing renewable energy potential and technologies, including storage can generate sufficient and secure power to cover the entire global electricity demand by 2050. The world population is expected to grow from 7.3 to 9.7 billion. The global electricity demand for the power sector is set to increase from 24,310 TWh in 2015 to around 48,800 TWh by 2050.

    Total levelised cost of electricity (LCOE) on a global average for 100% renewable electricity in 2050 is €52/MWh (including curtailment, storage and some grid costs), compared to €70/MWh in 2015.


  3. Is this woman a test of our patience?


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