Trailer: Before the Flood

October 4, 2016

Dark Snow Project Lead scientist Jason Box was Leonardo DiCaprio’s guide for some Greenland segments of this film.

Looks powerful.

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7 Responses to “Trailer: Before the Flood”

  1. dumboldguy Says:

    Yes, it does indeed look “powerful” and should have impact on those who see it, which raises the first question—-how many will see it? I would bet the answer will be “not enough”. My second question is—-Will the inevitable “there is hope” and other “feel good” segments outweigh the bad news parts in the minds of those who want to “think positive” and let too many walk away still largely in a state of denial?

    Case in point about the “there is hope” segments is the interview just before the 1:00 mark where we learn about India’s YUUUUGE solar push. I have often shouted CHINA-INDIA-COAL here on Crock, and guess what?—-coal is still the monster lurking under the bed in India. The energy situation in India is so complicated that it makes one’s head spin to try to figure it out. Try this article on for size.

    https://energydesk.greenpeace.org/2016/10/03/climate-india-coal-power/

    Yes, many in India do not have access to any electricity, and many more only for a part of the day. The same is true for water and it’s maybe even worse—-even in the richest parts of the richest cities in India, water does NOT flow 24/7. India HAS signed the Paris accords, but if the developed world does not hold up its end and help India (perhaps because we’re having another financial meltdown brought on by the greedy rich), things will go downhill fast—-they will scrap their solar plans and just burn coal.

    • addledlady Says:

      “The energy situation in India is so complicated that it makes one’s head spin to try to figure it out.”

      Having overdosed on a whole lot of stuff about India recently, I’d say that _everything_ in India is unbelievably complicated. It’s also true that other countries are equally strange in their own mysterious and not-so-mysterious ways – often largely due to the history of colonialism when you’re looking at Africa in particular – but India is a special case.

      Generally speaking, I’d say that supporting cheap prices for solar generally would do a lot to push coal backwards further and faster. However, looking at how some of the state and regional authorities seem to operate, no one could guarantee that there wouldn’t be some wildly complicated deals to keep coal going in some places. Let’s face it. They still have problems working out how to sell wheat across state borders in some areas. Deeply weird.

  2. Lionel Smith Says:

    …perhaps because we’re having another financial meltdown brought on by the greedy rich…

    Yep! And I would bet that there are some working in the background to bring that about.

  3. redskylite Says:

    It’s been 16 years since Leo interviewed a president on climate. And situation is now much worse.

    Bill Clinton – “Oh yes, over the long run, it’s one of the two or three major issues facing the world over the next 30 years,” Clinton replied. “I think it’s because it takes a long time for the climate to change in a way that people feel it, and because it seems sort of abstract now.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/energy-environment/wp/2016/10/03/its-been-16-years-since-leo-interviewed-a-president-on-climate-and-situation-is-now-much-worse/?utm_term=.d0dd2b734da5

  4. indy222 Says:

    Alas, the claim by the astronaut towards the end was incorrect – if we end all human emissions, temperatures will not rise a bit and then go back down. They’ll stay quite constant, as the forcing due to our out-of-radiative-balance +0.6w/m2 is pretty nearly counterbalanced by the continual CO2 absorbtion by the land and oceans. Opposite forcings with the ~same time scale of many decades, and in the end, temperatures don’t change at all. See Port et al. 2012, Mathhews and Weaver 2010. It’s not controversial.


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