New Video: Drought, Climate, Security, and Syria

November 10, 2015

Last month I touched on the impacts of climate extremes on vulnerable populations. This new video expands on that.  Not many of the commenters you hear talking about climate impacts on the Middle East, and the current refugee crisis, trace climate pressures much past the past decade’s drought in Syria.
Here, Kerry Emanuel of MIT pulls at more threads, the Russian heat wave of 2010, and the subsequent food pressure that flared in riots just before the “Arab Spring” revolts broke out across North Africa.  History teaches us that circumstances outside politics, religion, and oil, can also have an impact on events.

NYTimes:

Pakistan could in a decade become the world’s third-ranked nuclear power, behind the United States and Russia, but ahead of China, France and Britain. Its arsenal is growing faster than any other country’s, and it has become even more lethal in recent years with the addition of small tactical nuclear weapons that can hit India and longer-range nuclear missiles that can reach farther.

These are unsettling truths. The fact that Pakistan is also home to a slew of extremist groups, some of which are backed by a paranoid security establishment obsessed with India, only adds to the dangers it presents for South Asia and, indeed, the entire world.

Persuading Pakistan to rein in its nuclear weapons program should be an international priority. The major world powers spent two years negotiating an agreement to restrain the nuclear ambitions of Iran, which doesn’t have a single nuclear weapon. Yet there has been no comparable investment of effort in Pakistan, which, along with India, has so far refused to consider any limits at all.

The Obama administration has begun to address this complicated issue with greater urgency and imagination, even though the odds of success seem small. The recent meeting at the White House on Oct. 22 between President Obama and Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif of Pakistan appears to have gone nowhere. Yet it would be wrong not to keep trying, especially at a time of heightened tensions between Pakistan and India over Kashmir and terrorism.

What’s new about the administration’s approach is that instead of treating the situation as essentially hopeless, it is now casting about for the elements of a possible deal in which each side would get something it wants. For the West, that means restraint by Pakistan and greater compliance with international rules for halting the spread of nuclear technology. For Pakistan, that means some acceptance in the family of nuclear powers and access to technology.

At the moment, Pakistan is a pariah in the nuclear sphere to all but China; it has been punished internationally ever since it followed India’s example and tested a weapon in 1998. Pakistan has done itself no favors by refusing to join the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty and by giving nuclear know-how to bad actors like North Korea. Yet, it is seeking treatment equal to that given to India by the West.

For decades, India was also penalized for developing nuclear weapons. But attitudes shifted in 2008 when the United States, seeking better relations with one of the world’s fastest-growing economies as a counterweight to China, gave India a pass and signed a generous nuclear cooperation deal that allowed New Delhi to buy American nuclear energy technology.

Charles Pierce in Esquire:

The World Bank is warning us that the Great Climate Change Hoax has reached a new level of sophistication and deceit. Grant-fattened scientists will scour the globe, covertly impoverishing millions of people in furtherance of their anti-capitalist, anti-freedom agenda, and to make more money from George Soros and Tom Steyer. Wake up, sheeple!​

As many as 100 million people could slide into extreme poverty because of rising temperatures, which are caused by greenhouse gas emissions, the World Bank report said. The bank’s most recent estimate puts the number of people living in extreme poverty this year at 702 million, or 9.6% of the world’s population. Climate change has led to crop failures, natural disasters, higher food prices and the spread of waterborne diseases, creating poverty and pushing people at risk into destitution, according to Shock Waves: Managing the Impacts of Climate Change on Poverty, released on Sunday. Efforts to stabilise climate change should incorporate strategies to eradicate poverty, said Stéphane Hallegatte, a senior economist at the World Bank’s climate change group and co-author of the report. “The policies, the investments, the financing, all of that should be integrated. Otherwise, we’re just less efficient.”

 Not to be all apocalyptic or anything, but do you know what happens when there are millions of desperate, starving people? Wars happen. Brutal, vicious wars, fought with rocks and clubs and whatever else is at hand. War and hunger feed on each other until there’s nothing left to devour. Civilizations break down this way. Those sneaky scientists should stop what they’re doing with their scam. Someone might get hurt.​

10 Responses to “New Video: Drought, Climate, Security, and Syria”

  1. earlosatrun Says:

    That Esquire piece, it’s satire – right?

    Lie to me if you have to.


  2. It’s satire. Here’s another Charles Pierce article.

    “Yet [Exxon] kept funding climate-change denialists for nearly three more decades. Please tell me how doing something like this—and there are plenty of people like the Koch Brothers who still are doing it—won’t one day be counted as a crime against humanity? And it’s not as though we didn’t have lengthy previous experience with the damage that can result when scientists whore themselves out to industry.”

    http://www.esquire.com/news-politics/politics/news/a36337/climate-change-liars/


  3. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – drawing the connection between climate change and the mess that is Syria – compelling stuff. […]


  4. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – sketch a tie between meridian change and a disaster that is Syria – constrained stuff. […]


  5. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – drawing the connection between climate change and the mess that is Syria – compelling stuff. […]


  6. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – drawing the connection between climate change and the mess that is Syria – compelling stuff. […]


  7. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – drawing the connection between climate change and the mess that is Syria – compelling stuff. […]


  8. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – drawing the connection between climate change and the mess that is Syria – compelling stuff. […]


  9. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – drawing the connection between climate change and the mess that is Syria – compelling stuff. […]


  10. […] @@ Drought, Water, War, and Climate Change – sketch a tie between meridian change and a disaster that is Syria – constrained stuff. […]


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