August 2014: Greenland is the New Black

October 1, 2014

Jason Box returned to Greenland for a few days late in August, and was able to shoot the video above. Newest observations show the lowest reflectivity on record for Greenland’s Upper elevations.

jason_dktwitter

And there’s this.

NBC News:

Spongy sediments under Greenland’s ice sheet may accelerate its flow into the sea — an effect that previous estimates of ice loss failed to account for, according to University of Cambridge researchers. They said that means the ice sheet may be more sensitive than previously thought to overall climate change, along with short-term events like heavy rain and heat waves.

The researchers said it was thought that Greenland’s extensive ice fields rested on hard bedrock, but new evidence shows that soft sediments also are present. Those sediments weaken as they soak up water from seasonal melt, allowing the sheet to move faster to the sea, the researchers said. Greenland’s ice sheet covers 660,000 square miles (1.7 million square kilometers) to a depth of nearly 2 miles (3 kilometers) at its thickest. A 2012 study found that the sheet’s melting was accelerating, and a 2013 study estimated that because of melting in Greenland and Antarctica, sea levels could be 2 feet higher when today’s preschoolers are grandparents. The research was funded by the Natural Environment Research Council and published Monday in the journal Nature Communications.

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5 Responses to “August 2014: Greenland is the New Black”

  1. rayduray Says:

    NASA Earth Observatory: “Sediment Plumes Around Greenland”

    http://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/IOTD/view.php?id=84464

    Quote:

    “Toward the end of the 21st century, melting from the Greenland Ice Sheet could result in global sea level rise of 4-21 centimeters (2-8 inches), according to the Fifth Assessment Report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Toward refining that estimate, some scientists are taking a close look at the colorful plumes that pepper the ocean around Greenland’s perimeter.”

  2. redskylite Says:

    Another sad story from the Arctic circle reported in the Christian Science Monitor. The Arctic is clearly shouting at us, yet still some people are still too selfish and self-absorbed to hear:

    Quote Christian Science Monitor: October 1st 2014

    “It’s another remarkable sign of the dramatic environmental conditions changing as the result of sea ice loss,” said Margaret Williams, managing director of the group’s Arctic program, by phone from Washington, D.C. “The walruses are telling us what the polar bears have told us and what many indigenous people have told us in the high Arctic, and that is that the Arctic environment is changing extremely rapidly and it is time for the rest of the world to take notice and also to take action to address the root causes of climate change.”

    http://www.csmonitor.com/Environment/Latest-News-Wires/2014/1001/35-000-walrus-in-Alaska-come-onshore-as-Arctic-ice-melts-video


  3. […] Jason Box returned to Greenland for a few days late in August, and was able to shoot the video above. Newest observations show the lowest reflectivity on record for Greenland's Upper elevations. An…  […]


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