Half Bike, Half Ski, Half Jog, and Half the Dorkiness of the Segway.

March 20, 2014

19 Responses to “Half Bike, Half Ski, Half Jog, and Half the Dorkiness of the Segway.”

  1. dumboldguy Says:

    Sorry, but IMO this IS as dorky as the Segway.

    Having ridden two-wheel bikes far enough to circle the globe 1-1/2 times, I can say from experience that this thing is going to be of interest only to the young and fit, and over short distances. Standing on the pedals is something one does to climb hills or to go-like-hell on the flat for the sheer joy of it—-it gets old after a while, and the seat then comes in very handy.

    Although the thing looks “artsy” with its vertical “tiller”, there are many good reasons to put a normal 18″ handlebar on top of it. And in spite of what looked like a small “off road” excursion into the leaves, I wouldn’t take the thing anywhere but on smooth pavement—-with those tiny rear wheels and the narrowness of the track, it would likely be dumping you often (at least you’re closer to the ground than on a two-wheeler)


    • I don’t agree. Obviously, if you want to ride a bike, do that instead. This is a combines walking and cycling, and in a lot of urban settings I’d prefer that. You can walk at 3.5 mph, or you can do it with this at 8 mph with no problem.

      Regarding the safety, having been in a bike accident, I can assure you that standing is much safer than sitting. My accident involved flipping the bike. There’s no way to flip this thing. And if you “dump”, you simply step off.

      I don’t think you want to be doing this machine on single track, but then, I wouldn’t be doing single track on anything but a good fat tire mountain bike. Looks to me like gravel, or packed dirt roads wouldn’t be a problem. Looks like the front tire could handle it.

      Price might be a problem.

      • dumboldguy Says:

        This thing does NOT “combine walking and cycling”. You “walk” by putting shoe leather to pavement. This thing has wheels, pedals, gears and chain drive, and even a BRAKE. It’s even called a HalfBIKE.

        Maybe you live somewhere with smooth pavement as in the video clip, but in the “urban settings” around here in the DC area, the potholes and patches would swallow this thing alive, making it hard to use on the street. You can’t use it on the sidewalk with the problem pedestrians present in the urban core, so what good is being able to travel at 8 mph? You may as well walk.

        “Regarding the safety, having been in a bike accident, I can assure you that standing is much safer than sitting. My accident involved flipping the bike. There’s no way to flip this thing. And if you “dump”, you simply step off”.

        That comment regarding being in “a” bike accident makes me think that you haven’t ridden much. Those of us that do ride a lot have been in several accidents, lost some skin, destroyed some helmets, separated some shoulders and broken or cracked some bones. You’re right, you wouldn’t flip this thing, because it would be YOU that would “flip”—driving it is like driving your car while sitting on the front bumper. Your body will be the first thing to hit whatever you collide with, and things usually happen too fast for one to “step off”.

        “I don’t think you want to be doing this machine on single track, but then, I wouldn’t be doing single track on anything but a good fat tire mountain bike. Looks to me like gravel, or packed dirt roads wouldn’t be a problem. Looks like the front tire could handle it”. Anyone who takes this thing off smooth pavement is asking for trouble, and it’s the rear tires that cause me concern.

        “Price might be a problem”. I’d take one if they were giving them away. I suspect it’s going to be rather pricey because it will appeal to the “innovators” and “upscale”.

        PS Don’t forget that George W. Bush crashed a Segway.


        • I probably have as much cycling experience as you do, maybe more. My accident was from striking a pedal on a steeply banked curve on a hill on a road bike at about 20mph back in the 1980s. The bike flipped completely 180 degrees, landing me on my head. Obviously, given your pretentiousness, you don’t really know what you’re talking about.

          And standing is a lot safer than sitting, because you can step off the vehicle, whereas you have to take the bike to the ground if you have a spill. Ask anyone on a skateboard.

          Regarding my comment about riding and walking, that’s EXACTLY what you’re gong to do with this. You get off the thing and walk when pavement doesn’t allow you to ride. Well DUH!!!!!!! And 8 mph is better than 4 and a lot more efficient if you can glide down hills. Oh, maybe I forgot to tell you. This is an AVERAGE speed. You can go a lot faster for periods of the ride. Since you seemed to be a bike maven, I thought you would have figured this out.

          • dumboldguy Says:

            John Eric has taken a week to think about it and now wants to argue about nothing. I will oblige him.

            He says he “probably has as much cycling experience as I do, maybe more”. When I said I had ridden enough to circle the globe 1-1/2 times, I was referring to the actual mileage recorded in the riding log I used to keep, which was up over 35,000 miles. How far have you ridden, John? Total or single year? I have a number of years in the 3,000+ mile range, and have logged nearly 2000 miles some years as a member of the volunteer Trail Patrol on the 45 mile long W&OD Trail in Northern VA.

            John’s single accident (lovingly referred to by him as “my accident”) sounds like he was riding just a bit outside the safety envelope—-20 mph is a bit fast for a “steeply banked curve on a hill”, and one has to work hard to dig in a pedal.

            That said, going around a downhill curve and leaning in is a lot of fun. One of my two major accidents occurred in a similar fashion as I was going down a curved ramp to the right (much like a cloverleaf) off one trail and onto another that passed below. I had taken that ramp many hundreds of times over the years—it was concrete with good traction, slightly banked, and fun to lean into and “zoom” down and around. I slowed down to a safe speed, perhaps 10-12 mph, but when I got half way down (and as I was leaning into the curve), my tires just lost grip and shot out from under and I went down hard on my right side. Another biker coming up the ramp couldn’t stop and ran over me as I skidded out in front of him. Shattered the right side of my helmet, took a hand-sized patch of skin off my right shoulder, and several smaller patches off knees, elbows, and hands—-broke a thumb too. Could remember my name but it took a few minutes to recall the year.

            My other “major” accident (major means destroy a helmet and go to the hospital for x-rays and perhaps stitches, splints, bandages, and tetanus shots) occurred when a tourist in Alexandria VA popped open a car door without looking right in front of the Torpedo Factory. I had been riding long enough to know about getting “doored”, but this woman was driving one of those old Ford two-doors that had doors that were literally 6 feet long. I was riding far enough out to avoid normal doors, but she popped hers so fast and so close that I had no time to move further out, and the edge of the door caught the last 1/2 inch of my right handlebar as I went by at 15 mph. The next thing I knew, I was flat on my back 10 feet down the road. It happened so fast that I really didn’t see it, but the witnesses that came to my aid said that I did a complete somersault in mid-air and landed on my butt and back—-smashed the whole back of the helmet that time but it saved me. I did have a cracked right femur and a bruise on the back of my right leg and buttock nearly from knee to belt, as well as the usual small abrasions. I have had three partial shoulder separations (one from a motorcycle crash), and so many minor mishaps that I can’t even remember them all. If you have read the cycling mags, you know that anyone who is a serious biker can expect to have a “crash” of some kind every 3 to 5 thousand miles—I’m glad that I beat those odds by a wide margin.

            So, you can stuff your pretentious use of “pretentiousness”, because I do believe my experiences with crashes far outweighs yours. As a member of the Trail Patrol, I personally witnessed a number of accidents and came upon many others, and used my cell phone to summon an ambulance for people with broken hips, wrists, forearms, collar bones, and shoulders. Also several head injuries—ALL of whom were “casual riders and NOT wearing helmets—-none of the folks who had crashes severe enough to break bones ever suffered a head injury, because they all wore helmets.

            “And standing is a lot safer than sitting, because you can step off the vehicle, whereas you have to take the bike to the ground if you have a spill. Ask anyone on a skateboard”.

            Whatever you say, John. One of my jobs on the trail patrol was to tell skateboarders and scooter riders to find someplace else to ride, because they were deemed unsafe when mixed in with the walkers, joggers, and bikers. A number of the accidents I dealt with (until they were banned) were stand-up scooter riders—-tiny wheels dug in and “threw” the riders before they could “step off”. Resulted in wrist and arm injuries, and even a few busted heads.

            I’m not going to “DO” anything with this contraption, because it is just a “cutesy” toy cooked up by some “entrepreneur”, and it doesn’t do ANYTHING better than a bike can do, except puff up the self-image of the rider—-“Look at me and my cool toy”. Do you seriously maintain that this is a real alternative to a standard two-wheel bicycle? I predict they will sell a few, but don’t sell your Apple stock to invest in this.

            “Oh, maybe I forgot to tell you. This is an AVERAGE speed. You can go a lot faster for periods of the ride”.

            Yes, I can see you now, riding this thing down a “steeply banked curve on a hill at 20 mph”—-LOL—–since you “don’t seem to be a bike maven”, you will not likely figure this out.

            Let me finish by telling you that the most serious injury I ever saw on the trail was a college age girl who got her feet tangled when she came to a road crossing and fell over sideways—-she didn’t get a hand out in time and whacked her head on the pavement (no helmet). The EMT’s were so concerned about her condition and how fast it was deteriorating that they called for a helicopter—she didn’t have a visible mark on her body.


    • Your reply to mine down the page was a lot of blah, blah, blah. Long winded replies don’t make for reasonable arguments, and it demonstrates a bit of childishness.

      Obviously genius, I’ve been riding for a number of decades, if you can count. Did you notice that the accident was in the 1980s? I used to put 50 to 100 miles a week on a bike from the 1970s, including mountain biking single track. I’m now 72 but I still ride. Want to put the math together?

      My major accident was my ONLY accident (outside of a few minor spills). I was wearing a helmet, but if you check, helmets of that period weren’t all that good.

      Evidently, you’ve had a lot more accidents than I have. Does that mean you know more about accidents, or that I’m a much better rider than you? also, the following statement made by you is a big problem for your “expertise”

      “Let me finish by telling you that the most serious injury I ever saw on the trail was a college age girl who got her feet tangled when she came to a road crossing and fell over sideways—-she didn’t get a hand out in time and whacked her head on the pavement (no helmet). The EMT’s were so concerned about her condition and how fast it was deteriorating that they called for a helicopter—she didn’t have a visible mark on her body.”

      It is a BAD IDEA TO BREAK FALLS OFF A BIKE WITH YOUR ARM!! This is how you get a broken arm. I’ll document that for you if you wish. If you fall, you absorb this with a modified shoulder roll. Since I teach martial arts I should know something about break falls. (Look at my picture if you want to challenge me on this).

      You might also learn some brevity and less prevention for your posts. Long winded replies do not make for good argumentation.

  2. rayduray Says:

    And here in Oregon, we have the adventurous (not to mention eccentric) mountain unicyclists….


    • Is there something in the air? Or is it the water? 🙂 just hang glide off a cliff and get it over with.mor wear one of those flying suits with a rocket on the back and glide down. Caution, not for those intending to procreate.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      (A lot of weird folks in Bend, aren’t there?)

      We see unicyclists on the bike trails around DC regularly on weekends—-and like the guys in Bend, they’re young and seeking “challenges”. A unicycle is incredibly difficult to ride, period, and doing mountain bike stuff with one is insane (unless you’re looking for that “challenge” and a spot on one of the “Why Boys need Mothers” compendiums when you smack your skull on a rock). At least they travel only at a slow walking speed and it’s easy to bail out.

      We also have a small group of Penny Farthing riders—the old bikes with a huge front wheel and a small rear. They are direct drive like unicycles, and getting up on one is a real challenge.

      • skeptictmac57 Says:

        Aw,unicycles aren’t all that hard…it’s like falling off a bike 😉

        I did actually learn to ride one when I was 16. I banged the hell out of my ankles on the sharp edged crank arms,and it took me a good week or two to get the basics. The hardest part is overcoming your fear of falling and cracking your skull or tail bone.It causes you to tense up,and is counterproductive to keeping your balance.
        Bike helmets were not common in that era,and I would have felt much safer if I had one then.
        I do prefer my two wheeler Trek hybrid though.

        • dumboldguy Says:

          More power to you—-as Dirty harry said, “a man should know his limitations”, and I have never once been tempted to try a unicycle.

          I am on my third Gary Fisher Hoo-Koo-E-Koo mountain bike after 30 years of riding. I put smooth tread “road” tires on them and a 50 tooth large chain ring for higher top speed. Trek has bought Fisher and Bontrager, and my newest Fisher bike is decked out with Bontrager wheels and cranks—-very nice machine for pavement and smooth dirt and gravel—-a riding position half way between a road bike and the more upright hybrids is easier on my old back. I no longer take my bikes in the woods—-I leave the mud, cuts, and bruises to the young folks/

          Re: helmets? I don’t even take a test ride down the street and back without a helmet.

  3. dumboldguy Says:

    Made as a new comment so as to be less vertically “drawn out”.

    John Eric obviously likes to play “my dick is bigger than your dick”, and it’s early in the AM and raining here so I can’t go out and work in the yard. I’ll once again oblige him. I have pushed his buttons a bit, and HIS childish response is “you talk too much” and assorted insults like “genius” and “childishness”.

    Sticks and stones, John Eric, and an admission on your part of the weakness of your “argument”. Of course, you seem to be a fan of the “bald assertion”—-if John Eric throws out opinions and horsepucky and simply says it’s so, then it MUST be truth, and we don’t need to use a lot of words to describe “the world according to John Eric”. If you can’t concentrate long enough to read comments of the length needed to really say something, just stop right here and don’t respond. You won’t be the first to “abandon discussion” as the debaters say.

    Obviously, John Eric, I’ve been riding for a number of decades also—I’m nearly 74 and I still ride, and I’ve worn out derailleurs and gears on bikes—have you? If you can count, you’ll notice that 3000+ miles a year AVERAGES around 60 miles a week, although I don’t ride as often in the winter. My warmer month riding was 100+ miles per week, and one summer month I nearly hit 600 miles. I have it documented since 1993, when I suffered a small heart attack while bike riding and later some V-Tach in the ER. Ever get hit with defib paddles? Just like in the movies and not much fun. My ICD records arrythmia “events”, and my cardiologists wanted me to keep the log so we could correlate “events” with bike rides—-I can no longer “hammer” like I used to, but up until the last few years I could still outride most 45-year-olds.

    You say you “used to put 50 to 100 miles a week on a bike from the 1970s, including mountain biking single track”. Which is it, John Eric? 50 or 100? Sounds PFTA to me. That’s a big difference—kind of like saying “I drove to California but stopped in Kansas” Want to put the math together for us, or will you rest on yet another meaningless bald assertion? Do you ride in winter? I don’t very much any more.

    John Eric says “My major accident was my ONLY accident (outside of a few minor spills). I was wearing a helmet, but if you check, helmets of that period weren’t all that good”. I had “helmets of that period”, and my old Bell V-1 and others like it were quite good, just way hotter and heavier than more modern helmets. Is there a hidden message there? Is John Eric trying to tell us he suffered permanent brain damage in his “major accident” because he had an inadequate helmet? If so, my sympathies, and that would explain his present behavior on this thread and his fondness for the “gadget” that prompted it.

    John Eric says “Evidently, you’ve had a lot more accidents than I have. Does that mean you know more about accidents, or that I’m a much better rider than you?” We’d have to ride together to see who was the “better” rider, but I have no doubt that I know more about accidents than you, and I’d like to know where you do your riding—mine is in one of the most heavily congested suburban-urban areas in the country, and on trails that on weekends are crowded with tourists, novices, and casual riders. Bikers die in accidents with some regularity in this area. The Mt Vernon trail from DC to Mt Vernon along the Potomac is avoided by experienced bikers on the weekends because it is so dangerous. I did most of my trail patrol riding on weekends and used up more than one box of bandaids and a tube of antiseptic ointment every summer, sometimes giving out bandaids several times in one day. (We were provided by the Park Authority that runs the W&OD trail with first aid supplies to hand out, as well as water and brochures—-we did not treat folks as per the lawyers’ instructions, just gave them the materials so they or someone in their party could do so—-our main function was to call for the EMT’s on serious cases).

    “It is a BAD IDEA TO BREAK FALLS OFF A BIKE WITH YOUR ARM!! This is how you get a broken arm. I’ll document that for you if you wish. If you fall, you absorb this with a modified shoulder roll.”. How nice of John Eric to make that offer, and how condescending and clueless. As he said in another comment, DUH. I’m sure the young lady I mentioned would much rather have had a broken arm or wrist than a life-threatening head injury, but she was “uninformed” enough to have gripped the handle bar as she fell over sideways rather than attempt a “modified shoulder roll” from a standing still position with her feet tangled in the pedals. DUH again!

    “Since I teach martial arts I should know something about break falls. (Look at my picture if you want to challenge me on this)”.

    OOOOOOH! Look at the picture of John Eric in his PJ’s and tremble in fear at his “challenge”. Thanks again for the condescension, John Eric, but I played a lot of football, learned some minimal MA in the USMC (we were trained to shoot and kill them before they got close enough for hand-to-hand), and had to apply what MA I learned all too often on the job. I was perhaps a bit “accident prone” there too, because I had to go to the hospital a time or two, but as the saying goes, “you should see the other guy”.

    You might also learn to really say something of substance in your posts. What makes for “good argumentation” is an adequate number of facts and arguments stitched together into supportable positions. Point-counterpoint, and you need to answer questions that are put to you. Bald assertions and thrown-off statements of “the world according to John Eric” may make it with the knuckle draggers at the dojo or dojang (or the empty storefront in the strip mall), but not in the world of educated discourse (just to send some condescension back your way).


  4. All I have to say is, “blah, blah, blah”. You really didn’t answer any of the issues I raised, and came back with “WOW! look at what I did in the past!!!” In other words “my dick is bigger than yours!”

    Again, the math may be beyond you, but assuming I did the minimum of 50 miles a week for 30 weeks a year since 1978 for at least 25 years, that comes to somewhat short of 40,000 miles. And that is a minimum. Last I checked that’s around the world and then some, and that’s much less than I probably did (your word games not withstanding).

    And note while you’re at it that I use my real name, so my history on Facebook is quite open to the public. Yours? “Dumb old guy?” Well, I guess there’s truth in labeling! Good label to hide behind.

    I will say that the topic of this thread, the “half bike” is something I’d like to ride, even if you’re too “sophisticated” to try it.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      Yes, “blah, blah, blah” IS apparently all you can say, because YOU are the one who “really didn’t answer any of the issues I raised” or the questions I asked. You are the one who persists in playing “my dick is bigger than yours”—-I am much more interested in playing “my BRAIN is bigger than yours”.

      Your math is not “beyond” me—-I fully understand BS and PFTA “math” that rests on “assumptions” of how far you traveled and how often, and is “probably” much less than you “really rode”. Not very credible.

      It does not surprise me that you have a PAGE on facebook at your age. That supports the narcissism and egomania that peek out from your comments here. I don’t do facebook or twitter (and have no need to see more pictures of you in your PJ’s anyway). I don’t use my “real name” because I enjoy pushing the buttons of the “demented roosters who strut around the barnyard crowing about their imagined superiority”—and anonymity is the smart thing when dealing with folks like you. (And your whining about it is just another sign of your impotence. You fit the pattern nicely with that. If you can’t argue facts and logic, just resort to name-calling).

      “I will say that the topic of this thread, the “half bike” is something I’d like to ride, even if you’re too “sophisticated” to try it”, you say? I’d like to try it too, and would do so if someone brought one by my house. I am too well-informed bike-wise to think that it will ever replace a significant number of regular bikes, and if you were more “sophisticated”, you would understand why. I would love to see you ride it down your “steeply banked downhill curve” at 20 mph—it would be an interesting physics experiment.

      To close with a bit of physics, do you understand the concepts of center of gravity, baseline, and force vectors? And how sharply you can (or can’t) turn the “gadget”? Rather than make mindless personal attacks, you might better spend the time in doodling a bit and trying to figure out why it’s a toy rather than a serious vehicle.


      • Here’s an interesting quote from you:

        “OOOOOOH! Look at the picture of John Eric in his PJ’s and tremble in fear at his ‘challenge’”.

        The kids at the martial arts school where I train often get this kind of conversation from other kids at their middle school. So much so that when I see that kind of quote, I immediately suspect that the poster (who may be pretending to be an adult) is actually a child. Sometimes I even reference my Facebook account as a test for their age. At one website where I post at least 30 percent of the “troll” posters are young kids pretending to be adults. OK, you can use big words, but the conversation is a bit immature for an adult, leading me to conclude that you are not really an adult (or maybe an adult who’s regressing back to childhood?).

        • dumboldguy Says:

          An interesting comment from John Eric. A complete abandonment of any kind of intelligent discussion about the “gadget” under discussion, bicycle riding, biking accidents, physics, or the topics of narcissism and egomania.

          Instead, all John Eric wants to talk about is the rather narrow “world according to John Eric”, in which world he has decided that I MUST be a “child” and can’t POSSIBLY be an adult because I have had the temerity to question him.

          I find it interesting that “at one website where you post, at least 30% of the troll posters are kids pretending to be adults”. Would you care to share the name of that website with us? I’d like to go over there and look around, because I suspect that YOU are one of the children of which you speak. The fact that you DON’T use many “big words” and don’t seem capable of high level thinking here on Crock leads me to conclude that YOU are the “immature child”, and are hiding from that fact by trying to project that onto me.

          In case you haven’t noticed, John Eric, since you have “abandoned the discussion” (look it up under logic and debate) you have lost this inane little exchange over nothing that we’ve been having. Time for you to regress to being that demented rooster strutting around the barnyard crowing about his imagined superiority. (“I really told that dumboldguy a thing or two”). If you really are as old as you say you are, you should remember Foghorn Leghorn, that cartoon rooster that you channel so well.

          Last chance—-I will repeat my closing from my last comment. Do you want to discuss the physics of why the “gadget” is inferior to a regular bicycle for nearly all purposes? Or haven’t you gotten beyond middle school general science and have a few years to wait before you take HS physics?

          “To close with a bit of physics, do you understand the concepts of center of gravity, baseline, and force vectors? And how sharply you can (or can’t) turn the “gadget”? Rather than make mindless personal attacks, you might better spend the time in doodling a bit and trying to figure out why it’s a toy rather than a serious vehicle”.

          PS While we’re talking about “maturity levels”, would you care to expound on the “maturity” of a 72-year-old man who posts a picture of himself in his martial arts PJ’s on a climate change blog? Is that the “best” picture for this site that you have from 72 years of life?

          PPS If you have looked further into the halfbike, you will find that they want $899 for one. Anyone who is reasonably handy could assemble one in a few hours using parts that would cost no more than $300 new.


  5. Some answers to “dumboldguy”. the website where there are 30 percent kiddy trolls pretending to be adults where I post regularly is alternet.org. If Mr. Dumb would like me to identify some of those I suspect, I’ll be happy to do so. He can then check their posts. This is a left wing site, but the kiddy trolls are all spouting conservative nonsense.

    Regarding my picture in my karate outfit on a climate website, I have to use my Facebook account to post here. It’s a requirement. The pic goes with the account whenever I post. My Facebook account (if Mr. Dumb checked) is for communication with other martial artists, and occasionally with my relatives. I only made a brief reference to it because I anticipated some childish challenges from Mr. Dumb. He didn’t disappoint.

    Now for the physics of the half bike, I have no intention of using it for the local Ironman contest. So why would I be pushing the limits that Mr. Dumb thinks we should be pushing with this device? It’ll work fine in my local streets. The high price is an introductory price. He should check on the prices (allowing for inflation) for the first bicycles.

    Over to you, “dumboldguy”.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      Alternet? That’s a site I look at from time to time, although many of the posts are somewhat unfocused and “fluffy”—-perhaps I will look just to see what nonsense John Eric spouts there. I think it’s instructive that he characterizes it as a left-wing site.

      Since I have no interest in joining facebook, I can’t “check” what John Eric uses his facebook page for. Most facebook pages I have seen are for ego massage as much as real communication. I myself have several interest “groups” identified in my email address book, and use those to “bullet” messages to specific groups, thereby avoiding the inane “clutter” that seems to infect most facebook accounts.

      John Eric is obviously rather belligerent and argumentative, seeing “challenges” and looking for an argument in my simple inquiry into what makes a grown OLD man choose a CHILDISH martial arts PJ’s picture for a climate change blog. A facebook account is NOT required for posting on Crock—-it is one of several alternatives—-I myself have chosen to use a WordPress account, since Crock is a WordPress blog. John Eric cannot be ignorant of that, and, among many other unanswered questions, I am still waiting to hear why he chooses to frighten us with that picture.

      John Eric says “Over to you, “dumboldguy”. I am going to say “Over and OUT” in reply, because this discussion is going nowhere. The last paragraph of his comment makes it obvious that he is just playing here and has no intention of seriously discussing the halfbike. Either he is the child troll that has not yet taken HS physics or he is just a “string them along troll”, but in either case, I intend to waste no more time attempting intelligent and adult debate with him.

      “Now for the physics of the half bike, I have no intention of using it for the local Ironman contest. So why would I be pushing the limits that Mr. Dumb thinks we should be pushing with this device? It’ll work fine in my local streets. The high price is an introductory price. He should check on the prices (allowing for inflation) for the first bicycles”.

      The first part of that is merely deflection rather than an answer, particularly since my contention has been that we should NOT even “push” this gadget to the point of using it on local streets.

      The last bit of idiocy about “introductory price” and the “prices of the first bicycles” (allowing for inflation of course) seals the deal. Omnologos could not have said it better. Willful ignorance personified.


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: