Massive Storm Hits Northern Europe

December 6, 2013

Second time in a month. 140 mph winds this time.

Euro readers – weigh in.

23 Responses to “Massive Storm Hits Northern Europe”

    • NevenA Says:

      Wow, that Greenland ice core graph is epic misleading. I can’t believe you’re actually falling for this. Shouldn’t you change your name to King DUPE?

      Or do you know that graph is 100% bogus, but don’t care and just lie to your fellow human beings?

    • lesliegraham1 Says:

      Dear oh dear.
      Don’t you ever get embarassed by some of your own denierblogs.
      That one is just appalling.
      You actualy BELIEVE that that old fake greenland dome data set is the global temperature graph?
      Really?
      You actualy believe that?
      Desperate and pathetic.
      And what was the point about the the temporary short term lulls in the warming? You do realise that you actualy prove the scientist’s point about noise in the signal don’t you?
      Well – maybe not. In fact almost certainly not.
      And then you whinge that people treat deniers with contempt? Is it really that surprising?

    • lesliegraham1 Says:

      I was presuming that anyone reading this blog would be familiar with Easterbrooks fake graph but just in case there are a few lurkers who don’t know, Easterhouses graph ends in 1850.
      The first data point in the core has to be 1855 as it takes decades for snow to compact into ice. The start date is “BP” and BP is 1950 (somewhat confusing if you’re not a scientists perhaps) and the first data point in any core is 100 years before that.
      If you want to see how the current temperature compares you can see the up to date figures added here.

      These people are utterly without shame.

      Needless to say the temps are well above the past temps but bare in mind that this is just a single data point anyway and cannot be used to represent anything other than the temperature at that particular spot.
      It certainly doesn’t serve as a proxy for average global temperatures over taht time period.
      We have dozens of other proxies from all over the globe that perform that function with more being added every year.
      Interestingly ALL of them corroborate and verify the orginal Hockey Stick graph so hated by the Denial Industry.

  1. Tom Moran Says:

    Wow, 140 mph gust in Inverness, Scotland. That’s up in the mountains.
    Not a record or really all that impressive considering the past…
    Wind speed[edit]
    Ground Level Wind Speed Location Date
    mph km/h knots
    Low level 142 228 123 Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire 13 February 1989
    High level 173 278 150 Cairn Gorm 20 March 1986
    Shetland holds the unofficial British record for wind speed, which in 1962 was recorded at 177 mph (285 km/h) at RAF Saxa Vord.[3]

    • greenman3610 Says:

      Dude, I’ve been to Inverness – it’s just up the river from the North Sea.
      you can google it.
      that there have been other extreme events is not at issue. It is the increasing frequency of events that is of concern.
      https://climatecrocks.com/2012/10/25/insurance-giant-study-warns-extreme-events-a-game-changer/

    • lesliegraham1 Says:

      Inverness (my old home town) is at sea level and surrounded on three sides by sheltering hills.
      In fact it’s now becoming increasingly vulnerable to flooding.

    • lesliegraham1 Says:

      Low level 142 228 123 Fraserburgh, Aberdeenshire 13 February 1989
      High level 173 278 150 Cairn Gorm 20 March 1986
      Shetland holds the unofficial British record for wind speed, which in 1962 was recorded at 177 mph (285 km/h) at RAF Saxa Vord.[3]

      All fairly recent and all long after global warming began.
      Thanks for pointing that out.
      Probably just another one of those fantastic coincidences that seem to be happening every other day now.

  2. daryan12 Says:

    The storm was the first time the flood levels of the 1953 surge were exceeded. It did show however that the scientific studies of the North sea surge problem and the predictions regarding the dangers it posed were accurate. And the billions spent on barriers, re-flooding wetlands and other defenses meant the defenses more or less worked.

    So the lesson would be:
    – Even a moderate level of climate change, once you factor in the fact that parts of southern England & Holland are sinking (glacial rebound), could lead to more serious storms and larger surges, which could overwhelm existing defenses.
    – Listening to the experts when they say we’ve got a problem and spending the cash to fix it is certainly a good idea


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