One of the key indicators of what may happen in the future with higher co2 levels, is the paleo record. We can look at the Paleocene Eocene thermal maximum as a model for what our current pulse of co2 could do to the planet.

Peter Ward has been looking into much deeper time throughout his career.  The view over 4 billion years is instructive but not happy news.

We look for Fred Singer and the Heartland Institute to tout these results soon.

Right Wing Watch:

After blaming Colorado wildfires on a kiss between State House Majority Leader Mark Ferrandino and his partner that was featured on the Denver Post, pastor Kevin Swanson is also blaming the gay kiss on recent floods to hit the state.

While speaking with fellow pastor and Generations Radio co-host Dave Buehner, Swanson said that it is not a coincidence that the state experienced deadly floods at the same time Colorado “legislators committed homosexual acts on the front page of the Denver Post” and made sure to “kill as many babies as possible” and “encourage as much decadent homosexual activity as possible.” He even mentioned the new liberal marijuana law as a reason that the state is witnessing “the worst year ever in terms of flood and fire damage in Colorado’s history.”

Buehner added that “sometimes when you’re in a flood of dissipation, God might bring a real flood to show you the consequences of the flood of your dissipation.”

nsidc0913

National Snow and Ice Data Center:

On September 13, Arctic sea ice reached its likely minimum extent for 2013. The minimum ice extent was the sixth lowest* in the satellite record, and reinforces the long-term downward trend in Arctic ice extent. Sea ice extent will now begin its seasonal increase through autumn and winter. Meanwhile, in the Antarctic, sea ice extent reached a record high on September 18, tied with last year’s maximum.

Please note that this is a preliminary announcement. Changing winds could still push ice floes together, reducing ice extent further. NSIDC scientists will release a full analysis of the melt season in early October, once monthly data are available for September.

John Abraham and Dana Nuccitellli in the Guardian:

As Suzanne Goldenberg reported in The Guardian yesterday, Arctic sea ice appears to have reached its annual minimum extent, at approximately 5.1 million square kilometers. This is the 6th-lowest extent since the satellite record began in 1979.

But in fact, scientists have also reconstructed Arctic sea ice extent data much further into the past. For example, Drs. Walsh & Chapman from the University of Illinois have estimated sea ice extent as far back as the year 1870 using a vast array of data (for example, records kept by the Danish Meteorological Institute and Norwegian Polar Institute, and reports made from ocean vessels). While climate contrarians will sometimes try to argue that Arctic sea ice extent may have reached similar lows to today’s in the 1920s or 1930s–1940s, the data compiled by Walsh & Chapman tell a very different story.

Average July through September Arctic sea ice extent 1870–2008 from the University of Illinois (Walsh & Chapman 2001 updated to 2008) and observational data from NSIDC for 2009–2013

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Full disclosure: it’s my nephew. Pretty promising musician, and nice vid.

If you like it, you can vote it up at a music video site, Beat 100.

Paul Douglas update on Colorado and the hurricane watch in the Gulf.

While we’ve been watching Colorado, to the south, historic flooding from an unprecedented double whammy of tropical storms has devasted Mexico.

Reuters:

Tropical Storm Manuel lashed Mexico’s northwest coast with heavy rains on Thursday, prompting evacuations and adding to flash floods that have unleashed chaos across Mexico and killed at least 97 people.

Storms have inundated vast areas of Mexico since late last week, wrecking roads, destroying bridges and triggering landslides that buried homes and their occupants. Roads became raging rapids in the Pacific resort of Acapulco, stranding some 40,000 tourists.

Emergency services said heavy rains were beating down on the northwestern state of Sinaloa and that hundreds of people had been evacuated from coastal communities.

The U.S. National Hurricane Center said an area of low pressure over the oil-producing southern Gulf of Mexico had a 60 percent chance of becoming a tropical cyclone over the next 48 hours and could dump heavy rains on already flooded areas in southern and eastern Mexico.

The fresh misery comes after tropical storms Ingrid and Manuel converged on Mexico from the Gulf and the Pacific over the weekend, triggering the flash floods.

Ingrid dissipated, but Manuel then strengthened and gained hurricane strength before it was downgraded again to a tropical storm. Manuel was expected to weaken further to a tropical depression later on Thursday.

More than a million people have been affected across the country, and 50,000 have been evacuated from their homes.

The second in a series of “Dark Snow Log” posts. Combing thru the archives of footage and stills we picked up in Greenland, I’m pulling out little pieces of the story that I hope will eventually make a larger picture.

The first Dark Snow Log piece is below.

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I wrote not long ago about the developing trend in companies generating their own power. It’s not because their greenies, its because it makes them more green stuff.

This is a freight train gaining speed….

Wall Street Journal:

On a hill overlooking the Susquehanna River, two big wind turbines crank out electricity for Kroger Co.’s KR -0.57% Turkey Hill Dairy in rural Lancaster County, Pa., allowing it to save 25% on its power bill for the past two years.

Across the country, at a big food-distribution center Kroger also owns in Compton, Calif., a tank system installed this year uses bacteria to convert 150 tons a day of damaged produce, bread and other organic waste into a biogas that is burned on site to produce 20% of the electricity the facility uses.

These two projects, plus the electric output of solar panels at four Kroger grocery stores, and some energy-conservation efforts are saving the Cincinnati-based grocery chain $160 million a year on electricity, said Denis George, its energy manager. That is a lot of money that isn’t going into the pockets of utilities.

From big-box retailers to high-tech manufacturers, more companies across the country are producing their own power. Since 2006, the number of electricity-generation units at commercial and industrial sites has more than quadrupled to roughly 40,000 from about 10,000, according to federal statistics.
Experts say the trend is gaining momentum, spurred by falling prices for solar panels and natural gas, as well as a fear that power outages caused by major storms will become more common.

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