Symphony of Science: Our Biggest Challenge

September 12, 2012

I’ve been waiting for this. Well worth it.

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11 Responses to “Symphony of Science: Our Biggest Challenge”


  1. Brilliant
    (Haters gonna hate)

  2. otter17 Says:

    I have yet to find something from the Symphony of Science folks that I don’t like.

    I thank Peter kindly for introducing them to us. I loved the “We Are Stardust” song.


  3. […] Peter Sinclar Share this:Filed Under: Featured […]

  4. James Pavitt Says:

    I appreciate the sentiment and think it is very clever but it is definitely not for me – I hesitate to use the word cringeworthy, but that is how it affects me. Thanks for posting, but I have yet to hear any music written specifically to address or highlight climate change which ticks the box. It is as if every awful cliche in the book gets rolled out especially for climate change. I’ve been searching everywhere for half-decent music with a message and hardly ever get any further than ‘The Girl With The Sun In Her Head’ by Orbital (composed and performed live using solar power), ‘Pirate Jet’ from the Gorillaz album Plastic Beach and Joni Michell’s Big Yellow Taxi. I quite like “I’m A Climate Scientist’ from the Aus program Hungry Beast – in a tounge-in-cheek way. Has anyone else any suggestions?


  5. Works for me! The only thing I’d change is add some captions for people who don’t recognize Asimov, Alley and Nye.


  6. @ James Pavitt

    I’m a professional classical pianist and I wish, I really wish I could get myself to write the ultimate climate piece.
    It’s just very hard. Maybe that’s why the box is still unticked.

    I’m aware of my unique combination of having artistry, total climate awareness and dedication, good health, peace, free speech and money (Like you, I’m among the world’s top tier of richest people. I’m probably in some western statistic as ‘below the poverty line’).

    I could probably save the world if only I had some inspiration…
    Wish me luck!

    Meanwhile, I’ll settle for this superawesome song!

    • Alteredstory Says:

      Honestly, I think The Rite of Spring by Igor Stravinsky gets pretty damned close.

    • andrewfez Says:

      I prefer Sir Arnold Bax’s first symphony. It’s a huge sonic landscape dedicated to both the beauty and harshness of nature. Plus, as with a lot of ‘classical’ music, it doesn’t require any electricity (other than lights and climate control for the concert hall) to perform.

      Now that I think about it, most ‘classical’ groups are local groups that have permanent venues (if they’re large groups) , so that they aren’t expending large amounts of fossil fuels to fly or drive them, their support crew, their instruments, and their theatrical set or stage around multiple states or countries on ‘band tours’. Most classical groups don’t even have a theatrical stage that requires buses, or tractor trailers to cart them around, nor do they have the extra folks that assemble all that stuff who also need to be flown or driven around. Only the top groups, like LA Phil occasionally do out-of-state venues.

      There’s a lot of apples and oranges here, but if I were to guess, a local string quartet probably has a lower footprint than a local rock band does. A local 70 piece symphony orchestra probably has a lower footprint than a 70 crew touring band, and the LA Phil probably has a smaller footprint than Brittany Spears. Heck even classical soloist superstars, even though they do fly frequently, don’t drag around an entire orchestra with them: they use local orchestras to perform with. Compare that to Madonna who flew around 1000 dancers, techs, managers, family members, etc. all over the world on a tour, according to some “Lifestyles of the rich environmentalists” advert that is now playing on Youtube vids.

  7. guylacrosse Says:

    It’d be nice if more of the media got involved in promoting action on climate change. Videos like this one could inspire some people to get on board who are otherwise apathetic.


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