Deniers: This is what “Recovery” Looks Like

September 18, 2011

Headline from Climate Denial website: 

NSIDC: 

Arctic sea ice extent fell to 4.33 million square kilometers (1.67 million square miles) on September 9, 2011. This year’s minimum was the second lowest in the satellite record, which started in 1979. The lowest extent was recorded in 2007.

Over the last thirty years, ice extent, a two-dimensional measure of the ice cover on the Arctic Ocean, has declined in all months, with a more pronounced drop in summer. Scientists attribute this decline in large part to climate change.

The graph above is an early preview of my upcoming review of sea ice, where I will underline once again, that the most virulent form of climate denialism is not just ignorance, but evidence of a psychological disorder. ( see today’s video on the  tobacco industry)

24 Responses to “Deniers: This is what “Recovery” Looks Like”


  1. […] As I noted in a recent post, Arctic Sea ice has not been cooperating with denialist’s insistence on a “recovery&#8221… […]

  2. BlueRock Says:

    > …the most virulent form of climate denialism is not just ignorance, but evidence of a psychological disorder.

    Yup. There’s real pathology in the ‘dedicated’ deniers. They’re providing a wealth of material for psychology majors to study in the coming years.

    Two good examples in this comment thread.

    One empty vessel who clearly likes the sound his keyboard makes. Types volumes, says nothing of substance.

    The other far more weasely sneaky who tries to lecture us on good science but cherry picks sea level at one location as though it’s indicative of *global* sea level: http://sealevel.colorado.edu/. And he claims there is no “actual” (!) measurements of ice volume which is a lie… er… another mistake (see GRACE gravity measurement). The pattern of his ‘mistakes’ all go in one direction. Delusion or dishonesty? Same effect.


  3. […] measurements of Arctic sea ice cover (what’s left of it). You can see his excellent posts here and here. The short version of the Arctic sea ice story […]


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