Dueling Commercials Cover Both Sides of the Plug-in Generation

March 27, 2014

You may have seen the Cadillac Electric Hybrid Ad. I think it premiered during the Super Bowl, and has been bouncing around virally since then. I’m all about it because it sends the positive message that you can drive an electric car, care about the environment, and still be a smug, self absorbed a-hole. And that’s an important demographic to get on board.

Now Ford has a complimentary Ad, with a Detroit downtown feel, a more 21st century demographic, and a slightly different take on success.

About these ads

12 Responses to “Dueling Commercials Cover Both Sides of the Plug-in Generation”

  1. dumboldguy Says:

    Reminds me once again of why I don’t like Cadillacs and many Cadillac drivers (and their close relatives, Lincoln Navigators). In my youth in NJ, I used to have a bumper sticker on my Morgan Plus Four that said HELP STAMP OUT CADILLACS. It was the late 50’s-early 60’s, “small” cars were starting to appear on the roads, and many had such “joke” type stickers prodding the “boat” drivers.

    I was surprised to find that it actually enraged many Cadillac drivers, who tailgated, high-beamed, cut me off, and shook fists at me. And they got even more upset when I used the speed and nimbleness of the Morgan to “escape” them (with appropriate middle finger goodbyes).

    The Ford ad is really good—-they “get it”.

    • andrewfez Says:

      When i was 23 or 24 my pontiac sunbird started experiencing electrical problems and would shut down on the highway whilst driving, and after a few attempts at repair with no luck i bought a Cadillac Eldorado Touring Coupe, thinking it would be a reliable car. It was not a reliable car.

      In the 8 or so years that i owned it, the interior panels warped, the gas gauge sensor failed, the aluminum oil pan warped (costing me $3,000 to pull the engine out of the car to put a new oil pan in), the coolant pump failed, the power steering pump failed, it too had electrical shorts that left me stranded on multiple occasions (that never seemed to get fixed right until i took it to another repair shop after the 4th breakdown), the motorized radio antenna partially failed, the blower fan blew up with a loud pop and the car smelled like an electrical fire for a few months, the car always needed oil and stunk like burning oil half the time, the motorized sun roof was hard to close (upon trying to close it, it would automatically reopen, so you had to jiggle the button to abort its reopening when it momentarily achieved the closed position), it never drove straight even after an alignment (if you let go of the wheel it would veer off to the right), and when i ended up totaling it, none of the air bags were triggered.

      Lesson learned: don’t buy Cadillac, or maybe even GM, or maybe even American.

      Now i have an old, beat up Camry and it’s the best car i’ve ever owned.

      • dumboldguy Says:

        Not to get personal, but was your eight-year experience with the Cadillac some sort of religious thing? Like self-flagellation or crawling on bloodied hands and knees on pilgrimages?

        I owned a string of Volvos starting in the 1960’s. The earliest ones were the best cars I ever owned, but then they got too complicated, unreliable, and expensive to repair. So I went Japanese—had an ’82 Corolla station wagon that still ran great when I junked it in 2003 because the body was disintegrating and half of the door and window mechanisms had broken. The Japanese now “do steel better”, because my Mazdas (’99 Protege and ’03 MPV van) are showing little sign of rust.


  2. The Ford ad is unreal.  Green entrepreneurialism is a SWPL thing.


    • Who’s actually making compost in Detroit?  (I should say, doing it deliberately.)  They don’t resemble the city council or the board of education very much.

      • Phillip Shaw Says:

        Actually, finding out about composting in Detroit doesn’t take any more effort than effort than doing a Google search with the terms detroit urban farms composting. By posting your snark, which was at the least stereotyping and rather uncomfortably racist, you added nothing to this thread.


        • Actually, I followed the link on the second YouTube video itself.  I linked the image gallery of its site.  A Google Images search for “Pashton Murray” with “detroit dirt” produces no results.

          Since the leftist obsession with “optics” is also evident here, why is it not pertinent that the embarrassingly-pale people behind Detroit Dirt were replaced by a very, very Black woman for the sake of the ad?  Why isn’t affirmative-action casting worthy of comment?

    • dumboldguy Says:

      Given your well-established irony deficiency, your comment is understandable. You have missed the point (and perhaps shown a bit of racism?).


      • There are exactly two Black faces in the Detroit Dirt image gallery; all the other visible ones are obviously White.  Neither wears an afro.  Why then did the ad agency cast a Black woman with an afro in the CEO role?  Isn’t “correcting” racial composition a racist act, or is it only racist to notice?

  3. dumboldguy Says:

    Will E-Pot ever “get it” and/or learn to overcome his nasty little streak of racism? Or at least stop displaying it to the world with comments like these?

    “Why is it not pertinent that the embarrassingly-pale people behind Detroit Dirt were replaced by a very, very Black woman for the sake of the ad? Why isn’t affirmative-action casting worthy of comment?”

    “Why then did the ad agency cast a Black woman with an afro in the CEO role? Isn’t “correcting” racial composition a racist act, or is it only racist to notice?”

    Steps for self-awareness:

    1) Go back and view the ad. Note “smug self absorbed a-hole”. Realize that GM and Cadillac were guilty of producing what appears to be a deliberately over-the-top ad aimed at a certain “demographic” (which obviously includes you, since you seem to approve of it).
    2) Rent, beg, borrow or steal a sense of humor and irony and realize that Ford was cleverly (and at the same time seriously) spoofing Cadillac, and in the world of advertising in general (and selling cars) it’s all part of the game.
    3) If and when you grasp 1) and 2), try to deal with the fact that you (as an obvious “white” person with racial hangups) are unworthy of making comments about “VERY VERY black” people “with Afros”, and perceived “affirmative action casting”. It is not racist to “notice”, because it was so obviously deliberate on Ford’s part, but it IS quite racist for you to comment on what you term “correcting racial composition”.

    I will second Phillip Shaw’s comment that your comments add nothing to this thread (or to your reputation). Please give it up before you further embarrass yourself.

    (PS Tell us, E-Pot, do you display a Confederate Battle Flag somewhere on that Ford EV that you can’t seem to identify by name for us?” Just asking)


    • Realize that GM and Cadillac were guilty of producing what appears to be a deliberately over-the-top ad aimed at a certain “demographic” (which obviously includes you, since you seem to approve of it).

      I never mentioned the first ad, or its demographic.  It’s utterly amazing that you can find a message of approval in a total lack of comment.  Does your gift work in any other context?  Californians would love it if you could, for example, find several feet of rainfall in their next period of zero precipitation.  Their aquifers could certainly use it.  Talk to Gov. Moonbeam about your rates.

      Rent, beg, borrow or steal a sense of humor and irony and realize that Ford was cleverly (and at the same time seriously) spoofing Cadillac

      By now you should have learned that I declared that the problem with the Volt is that it didn’t have a Cadillac badge 5 years ago (though Richard Schumbacher seems to have beaten me to it by a few weeks).  It looks more like the Cadillac ad is designed to make PHEV drivers look like assholes and destroy any appeal the car might have (has the ad actually run anywhere?).  Few if any people in the country-club set care about gas mileage, and we know that there are people inside GM who hate EVs and do not want to build them.  If they destroy the market for the car with such ads, they can stamp it a failure and not build a sequel.

      If I was looking for a match of PHEV and target demographic, I’d make the vehicle a kid-hauler and aim it at upscale soccer moms.  Quiet, smooth, pre-cools the car on hot days when the kids are at practice, and has to deal with smelly and sometimes unsafe visits to the filling station a lot less frequently.  I’m not even sure if Cadillac has anything in the crossover segment where those go; I pay no attention these days.

      try to deal with the fact that you (as an obvious “white” person with racial hangups)

      You mean, when I was upset about having my car’s toolkit and a bicycle stolen by Blacks from my rented duplex a few years back, it’s “a hangup” and not a legitimate beef?

      are unworthy of making comments about “VERY VERY black” people “with Afros”, and perceived “affirmative action casting”.

      You mean, when two White geeks who created the prosthetic tail for the maimed dolphin were replaced in the movie by Morgan Freeman, I was IMAGINING the affirmative-action nature of the casting?  Ditto when every TV ad I see casts the Black guy in the role of the smart, hip problem solver?  How about the Pepsi ad which made a joke out of Black violence done to a White girl?

      I will second Phillip Shaw’s comment that your comments add nothing to this thread (or to your reputation).

      Except to raise your consciousness of things you’d rather ignore.

      do you display a Confederate Battle Flag somewhere

      Not on the car or anywhere else.  Don’t even have any bumper stickers or decals.  But thanks for asking, your question is quite revealing.  That’s the reason I throw these bits of un-PC chum in the waters here, to see what bites.

      • dumboldguy Says:

        “That’s the reason I throw these bits of un-PC chum in the waters here, to see what bites”, says E-Pot. So he’s just JOOOOO-king and stirring the pot, and now tries to get away with projecting HIS problem on those of us who “bite”.

        Nice try, E-Pot, and your protestations might have been somewhat believable if you hadn’t been compelled by your racism to insert such obvious “flags” as:

        “….I was upset about having my car’s toolkit and a bicycle stolen by Blacks from my rented duplex…
        “….every TV ad I see casts the Black guy in the role of the smart, hip problem solver?….”
        “….the affirmative-action nature of the casting….”

        It’s OK to be a bit racist, E-Pot. I’ve known and worked with black folks who have had no problems admitting to their prejudices against whites in general and even certain categories of blacks. The difference is that they were aware of their racism and fought it. You don’t even seem to be aware of yours—-that’s why I asked about the Confederate battle flag—-in my neck of the woods, guys who talk like you often display them on their vehicles.

        I’m sorry that you couldn’t take my advice—-I will repeat it. “I will second Phillip Shaw’s comment that your RACIST comments add nothing to this thread (or to your reputation). Please give it up before you further embarrass yourself”.
        (Yet AGAIN)


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