Creationist Outrage on Cosmos/Tyson

March 13, 2014

Yes, its 2014.

There are actually TV stations in Oklahoma that are censoring part of deGrasse Tyson’s new Cosmos series.
So you can see how Senator Inhofe keeps his job.

About these ads

15 Responses to “Creationist Outrage on Cosmos/Tyson”


  1. Surprise, surprise, surprise …

    When someone is against education it usually means they want to control other people. Same goes for people who are anti-science.


  2. Still find it odd that Fox is actually airing this. I was under the impression that its viewers were mainly Christian fundamentalists? I mean the whole study of the cosmos is looking back in time, way beyond what they regard as when their deity created the heaven and the earth. Doesn’t it bother them that the photons in the light of the stars hitting our eyeballs when we look up at the sky was emitted way before this creation supposedly happened? I mean do they dispute the speed of light as well? And if so, why even watch a show like Cosmos? Or indeed why is Fox airing this knowing their viewers don’t “believe” in it?

    • dumboldguy Says:

      Don’t know how TV is organized in Norway. There are two Fox networks here—-the cable network is the one that is a right wing propaganda arm and is watched by the fundamentalists and other old white folks suffering from cognitive dissonance. The free broadcast network is a bit more “sane”—in the Washington DC area and most big cities, we have affiliates from the three biggies—-NBC, ABC, and CBS—-as well as Fox, and there is little difference between them—-they’re all “mainstream media”, with all that implies.


  3. A few years ago, several of my family members moved to Colorado.

    Since then, I’ve been making annual trips back there, and I’ve been able to compare the Colorado Rockies with the California Sierra.

    Both have their attributes — The Rockies have the edge in fall colors (all the aspens), while the Sierra (Yosemite/Tehipite Valleys, the eastern escarpment) tend to be more spectacularly rugged (sheer granite vs. the older sedimentary rock predominant in the Colorado Rockies).

    But I’ve come to appreciate one big advantage that the Sierra Nevada range has over the Rockies. The Sierra range isn’t within a day’s drive of Oklahoma. So right off the bat, you can expect to see a higher class of tourists in the Sierra than you will in the Rockies.

    To the sane Oklahoma residents who are reading this, remember that we Californians take plenty of heat for our colorful stereotypes, i.e:

    Q) What did the Californians do when they heard that their state was
    going to break off and slide into the ocean?
    A) They all went down to the beach to watch.

    Q) How many Californians does it take to screw in a light-bulb?
    A) 10 — 1 to screw in the light-bulb, and 9 to share the experience.

    Q) How many Californians does it take to screw in a hot-tub?
    A) …

    So we don’t feel bad at all about dishing it out a bit — especially to the Oklahomans who keep returning Inhofe to the Senate.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      On your trips to CO, have you perchance noticed the bumper stickers that say “Don’t Californicate Colorado”? Maybe they’re talking to you and suggesting you stay in the Sierras?

      And I’ve met many more Texan than Oklahoman tourists in CO. Maybe it’s because I only go to CO in the summer and all the Oklahomans are busy staying home and obeying the highway signs that say Do Not Drive Into Smoke?

  4. Sir Charles Says:

    Religion has always been good for controlling the people. That’s its main task.


  5. […] Yes, its 2014. There are actually TV stations in Oklahoma that are censoring part of deGrasse Tyson's new Cosmos series. So you can see how Senator Inhofe keeps his job.  […]


  6. Hmm. This was surprisingly … expected. I think the words Creationist and Outrage are listed as synonymous in the Dictionary Insanitorum.

  7. Andy Lee Robinson Says:

    My favourite:
    “If the sun is a star, then why doesn’t it come out at night like the others?
    Checkmate, atheist!”

    When people realise that “Intelligent Design” designed such an unintelligent concept, it spontaneously disappears in a puff of logic!

    All we can do is try to educate or ignore them and hope they’ll evolve a prefrontal cortex, or wither away because beating them over the head with a T-Rex thigh bone won’t even make a dent.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      “If the sun is a star….” Good one! (And O’Reilly would approve)

      Actually, biology teachers would much rather encounter students who advocate intelligent design than “believers” thumping bibles with big bookmarks inserted at Genesis. The latter just say “It’s in the Bible and the Bible is the Word of God and it’s Inerrant and you can’t make me learn about Evolution because it’s against my Religion” (and they WOULD say that without taking a breath). The only reply to that is “This is a science class, not a religion or philosophy class, it WILL be on the test, and you are welcome to fail”. The occasional bible-thumping fool that wanted to make a scene over it in class was told to leave and find a religion or philosophy class to sit in.

      Intelligent design IS “intelligent” to the extent that it attempts to blend science and religion, and that allows real science to perhaps gain a toehold in otherwise closed minds. I used to present Evolution to the ID types with “Know thy enemy—the more you know and understand about evolution, the better equipped you’ll be to argue against it”. Some of them learned the “facts” of Evolution well—-my hope was that some day when they “grew up” and gained more knowledge and insight, they would overcome their religious indoctrination and come to accept scientific truth.

  8. archaeandragon Says:

    “Tide goes in; tide goes out. *YOU* can’t explain that.”

    It’s called the O’Reilly Factor which, as it turns out, is a very accurate measure of complete and utter stupidity.


  9. It’s worth remembering that the only was that virtually anybody ever enters into Christianity in the first place is either thru childhood brainwashing or else while still profoundly ignorant of the Bible itself.

    Knowing that children can be taught to believe anything it’s reasonable to wonder whether the child’s brain, still actively forming neurons and synapses, might in susceptible children become (permanently?) hard-wired to believe even the most ridiculous bronze- and iron-age stuff.

    That reality has a liberal bias is probably multi-factorial. This may be one factor. There’s not much one can do about it once it’s established.

    • Andy Lee Robinson Says:

      And that is why education is so vital – every new generation of people are basically cave people until educated, and progress is not guaranteed – it requires effort and investment to maintain knowledge and knowhow, especially scientific and technological knowhow.

      It is too frighteningly easy to subvert and revert to magic and mumbo-jumbo.


      • I believe that our brains are essentially flawed as Steven Novella say:

        Our brain is essentially a big magic trick with regards to how we perceive things, so heavily processed that we are almost evolved to believe our own lies. Children exemplify this so clearly as they not yet learned how to conceal their blame – so they can play in a sofa and kick over a vase which breaks – and then seconds after say “it wasnt me” – or blame the pillow in the sofa or something.

        I believe training yourself to be self-critical and skeptical is essential – and really should be the first thing we teach children in school. We seems almost hard wired to push blame onto others – and have snake-like behaviour around things that are inconvenient truths. This naturally extends to how we accept science vs religion.


    • Well, to know why people become religious you have to see what society exists around e.g. Christian people. While previously the priest could tell the church goers that if you did not believe you would go to hell, that isn’t a common way of recruiting new believers these days. In some religions that is still the norm however, as it is about “belonging” to some group – its a group mentality. If you believe – then I believe – or I get shunned and might even have problems getting food on my plate. Believe me this is often the case in many countries still. It makes it also very easy to stigmatize e.g. gay people as its more of the same “are you with us or are you against us” kind of thinking.

      There are several reasons why people choose to believe in a deity:

      – Classic brainwashing through upbringing (either you believe or your parents hate you – all children need love from their parents and will believe anything in order to get comfort). Psychological conflicts no matter how subtle can bring any child to its knees – as they seek love like any other creature.

      – Through tough times – war, famine, drug addiction, whatever – when life seems utterly meaningless – people seek for a meaning – the more suffering – the more religion – people need something to cling to – some kind of hope – a deity is often that entity that for some reason becomes a pillar to lean on – again because many others do the same – and hence you are part of a group again – and groups are good often supportive – and might even be what gets you through the crisis

      – Religious people can be “open” and friendly. No its true, many religious people are very friendly people, easy going, smiling, some have a strange calm about them – as if they are walking on clouds. Personally I have found many to be very good and giving – non selfish beings – not the classic “hey look at my cool car” egomaniacs you meet in life in general. This can easily draw people who generally have a problem with classic consumption culture. Although I am not sure many religious people are particularly less of consumers, they seem to share more of their wealth with others – after all e.g. the Bible has a lot of compassion and loving ones neighbor kind of text. So their behaviour is seriously altered towards being “better people” – which is actually very good for society as well.

      Generally people encounter one or several of these during their life so chances are a substantial number will build some kind of faith in a deity. No doubt there are a lot of “in betweeners” – in doubt about everything – being pulled to either sides due to their experiences.

      Although science tries hard to explain a lot, it still does not explain everything – and some things are so hard to understand that the complexity itself becomes a barrier to the necessary understanding. Some just have narrative problems with regards to complexity. Just look at how many people regard computers – they become almost alien things – that they just hope will work when they need them. While a computer literate will have no problem opening the thing and swap out some memory chips and perhaps even know how the electronics inside works. In depth knowledge almost makes people magicians in the eyes of others. And that is the problem – the cognitive dissonance between perceived magic and the knowledge required to master something yourself.

      I believe many religious people do not challenge themselves enough to go into depth about something in the fear that it is not something they will master – and that there is something “eerie” about what they perceive as magic or gods creation. But its also so clear that there is something odd going on in their minds as on one hand they readily accept these magicians around them making iPhones and Nuclear power plants and whatnot – and then this idea that god placed all these tools in our hands. Its one part of religious people I still don’t get – and wonder if they ask themselves these questions often enough.


Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 1,625 other followers

%d bloggers like this: