Alaska Slushy in Winter Warmth

February 4, 2014

alaskawarm

Minus 11 F when I got up monday in Mid Michigan.

NASA Earth Observatory:

While much of the continental United States endured several cold snaps in January 2014, record-breaking warmth gripped Alaska. Spring-like conditions set rivers rising and avalanches tumbling.

This map (above) depicts land surface temperature anomalies in Alaska for January 23–30, 2014. Based on data from the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA’s Terra satellite, the map shows how 2014 temperatures compared to the 2001–2010 average for the same week. Areas with warmer than average temperatures are shown in red; near-normal temperatures are white; and areas that were cooler than the base period are blue. Gray indicates oceans or areas where clouds blocked the satellite from collecting usable data.

accujet0125

A persistent ridge of high pressure off the Pacific Coast fueled the warm spell, shunting warm air and rainstorms to Alaska instead of California, where they normally end up. The last half of January was one of the warmest winter periods in Alaska’s history, with temperatures as much as 40°F (22°C) above normal on some days in the central and western portions of the state, according to Weather Underground’s Christopher Bart. The all-time warmest January temperature ever observed in Alaska was tied on January 27 when the temperature peaked at 62°F (16.7°C) at Port Alsworth. Numerous other locations—including Nome, Denali Park Headquarters, Palmer, Homer, Alyseka, Seward, Talkeetna, and Kotzebue—all set January records.

alaskariversed

The combination of heat and rain has caused Alaska’s rivers to swell and brighten with sediment, creating satellite views reminiscent of spring and summer runoff. On January 25, 2014, the Aqua satellite collected this image of sediment flowing into the Gulf of Alaska from numerous rivers along the state’s southeastern coast.

All of the heat, moisture, and melting snow has elevated the risk of avalanches. A series of extremely large avalanches in late January sent snow and debris crashing onto the Richardson Highway, blocking the road and cutting the port town of Valdez off from highway access. The avalanches dumped a mound of snow 100 feet (30 meters) tall and up to 1,500 feet (460 meters) long on the highway.

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33 Responses to “Alaska Slushy in Winter Warmth”


  1. […] Minus 11 F when I got up monday in Mid Michigan. NASA Earth Observatory: While much of the continental United States endured several cold snaps in January 2014, record-breaking warmth gripped Alask…  […]

  2. rayduray Says:

    Have you ever felt like being a voyeur at a ten course catastrophe? We’ll here’s your chance. Dr. Jeff Masters-of-Disasters says “it’s showtime, folks!”

    http://www.wunderground.com/blog/JeffMasters/comment.html?entrynum=2626

  3. rayduray Says:

    Your two and a half minutes of zen. Alternately, about a million gallons of Bakken crude oil per minute rolling through Seattle. “Roll on Columbia” this is not….

  4. climatebob Says:

    You should try living next to a coal mine or power plant and see how long you last.

    • rayduray Says:

      Huh? Why in the world do you come up with ridiculous choices like this? Is this some sort of game of trying to find out which level of hell in Dante’s Inferno we’re all to be forced into in a post-industrial dystopia? Sheesh. I don’t have any interest in living next to a coal mine or a power plant. Why would I?

      I felt as did many of the citizens of Meredith, NY that the town was about to be swindled by Wall Street operators. I’m delighted they replaced the town board and attorney and began to consider a co-operative alternative to the swindle being proposed by the Wall Street racketeers.

      The capitalist model has been utterly corrupted in many ways. The crazy tax credit racket for green energy is one example of a good idea turned on its head by charlatans and con-men. It’s time to come to grips with the pervasive and dysfunctional flaws of capitalism before capitalism makes life unbearable for the majority of us.


      • Ray – there is a bigger picture than this movie represents.. I could understand why a brief viewing of this film would make an impression. They are designed to do so. The source pretends to inform you so you won’t be naive. But don’t be naive. Abolishment of naiveté can’t be handed to you. You have to do critical thinking to make it happen. This movie is biased and backed by coal interests. I am sure wind is not perfect and that there are ways to look at it both negative and positive. The thing is, this movie does not do that. If there is one thing a movie backed by such blatant bias does not do, it is look at things in a balanced perspective. Stepping outside the movie, there must be choices made about energy sources and means. It is pointless to look at those choices out of context. If we talk about bird kills, look at all the energy sources and other things, like cats, that kill birds. If we talk about anything else about one form of energy, look at all of it in the balance. If we fail to do that, we fail to make responsible choices. There are no free lunches. The adult world is full of realities most would like to forget. Wishful thinking will not make pollution go away or allow endless fossil fuel consumption and there are no energy sources without consequences. It is ironic, that coal interests attempt to paint the least environmentally impactful source in a bad light. These arguments present the futility of arguing negative impacts of wind energy by viewing them from an absolute yardstick instead of by comparison with the alternatives.

        • rayduray Says:

          Christopher,

          I was not aware of coal money being spent on “Windfall”. So I did a Google search for proof. I can’t find it. Instead here’s about all I find that is germane using the key words “coal money” AND “Windfall”:

          http://saveourseashore.org/?p=2177

          Can you provide us with links supportive of your assertion that coal money paid for the creation and/or distribution of “Windfall”? Thanks.

          ***
          I find myself in broad agreement with your analysis of the energy game. I do not for a second however accept that the views expressed in “Windfall”, nor my own appreciation for the film to be naive in the least. Let me give you just one obscure example. I have built up a significant dossier on the seasonal hyperoxyenation of juvenile salmon in the Columbia River due to competing electricity supply streams from wind turbines and a robustly flowing river. Not many people have made that study. But when I did, I found to my horror that the Wall Street financiers of the pampered, taxpayer subsidized wind farms were using every judicial resource in their kit to do the wrong thing and fight public power as well as take a cavalier devil-take-the-hindmost attitude toward the endangered salmon.

          This is when I started to really loathe the swindlers on Wall Street in a very visceral fashion. They are evil. They are using the naivete of the green energy movement to destroy the very heart of nature. These swindlers are a crime against nature. So, naturally, I sided with the average citizens of Meredith, NY, who are fighting against the same monsters, attempting to foist the same racket on these citizens as they’ve done out West.

          Let me know if you’d like to get up to speed on how to destroy salmon smolts with too much too much oxygen and too much water. It’s a doggone counterintuitive mess.

          • dumboldguy Says:

            Ray says, “I was not aware of coal money being spent on “Windfall”. So I did a Google search for proof. I can’t find it. Instead here’s about all I find that is germane using the key words “coal money” AND “Windfall”:

            http://saveourseashore.org/?p=2177

            And asks, “Can you provide us with links supportive of your assertion that coal money paid for the creation and/or distribution of “Windfall”? Thanks”.

            Ray, You need to google a whole lot more different sets of key words then just “coal money” and Windfall”to find the “dirt”. You actually had a start with the “save our seashore” link because Lisa Linowes, who is listed as the “outreach director” and technical adviser for the Windfall film is the head of IWAG (Industrial Wind Action Group). Christopher Arcus has given you some leads, here are some direct quotes from a Green Mountain Daily piece about Linowes and IWAG from a year ago.

            “Last August, the Sierra Club documented the increasing attacks on renewable energy in its report, “Clean Energy Under Siege.” The report described IWAG as one of a growing network of anti-renewable groups promoting fossil fuel-funded “research” at odds with mainstream science. The report also documented her ties to notorious anti-renewable advocates, which can be seen at the “free-market energy blog” MasterResource, which is vociferously critical of all types of renewable energy. And she was one of the attendees at a February 2012 gathering of “wind warriors” — free-marketeers, many of whom with ties to fossil fuel barons like the Koch Brothers, who met to develop anti-renewable strategies”.

            “The Sierra Club describes IWAG as “run by husband-and-wife team Jonathan and Lisa Linowes. Jonathan is a politically active Tea Party member and the listed owner of the IWAG website. Lisa is the face of the organization….he’s a climate change denier”.

            “Checks and Balances found that IWAG relies heavily on the work of “experts” employed at “think tanks” heavily funded by fossil fuel interests, including Koch Industries and ExxonMobil.”

            You will find Mercatus, Cato, ALEC, CEI, and other monsters in the IWAG closet. And if you dig deep enough, you will even find that looney-tunes John Droz, Jr. is associated with IWAG, and John Droz is associated with our very own DAVE BURTON and NC-20! Small world, isn’t it? So is there “coal money” behind Windfall? Yep.

        • rayduray Says:

          Thanks dumboldguy,

          Re: ““Last August, the Sierra Club documented the increasing attacks on renewable energy in its report, “Clean Energy Under Siege.” ”

          You have provided a great summary of some nefarious links.

          Alas, it seems no one has clean hands in this energy game. I’ve castigated the Sierra Club’s ex-CEO Michael Brun for surreptitiously taking $26 million from the fracking king/ex-CEO of Chesapeake Oil & Gas to use in an anti-coal campaign.

          It seems everyone is tainted one way or another.

          But I do enjoy wearing my “Stop Coal Exports” tee-shirt I got at a rally from a Sierra Club paid staffer who was working with ex-NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s money to make me look like a more attractive proletarian. :)

          • dumboldguy Says:

            Ray, it would appear that your zeal to slay dragons has made you a bit careless. If you had done your homework, you might have discovered that Michael Brune discussed this issue on his blog just over two years ago on 2/2/12. He talked about the fact that the $26 million deal was BEFORE his time at the helm and that he was ENDING all ties between natural gas and the Sierra Club.

            If anyone needs to be “castigated”, it’s YOU for so baldly stating that it was Brune that “surreptitiously took $26 million from the fracking king/ex-CEO of Chesapeake Oil & Gas to use in an anti-coal campaign”.

            It’s also rather judgmental to say “Alas, it seems no one has clean hands in this energy game. It seems everyone is tainted one way or another”, just because the Sierra Club DID take some money that was less dirty (at the time) to attack something that was more dirty. Grow up, and understand that “the enemy of my enemy is my friend” is often the way of the world.

            You say “But I do enjoy wearing my “Stop Coal Exports” tee-shirt I got at a rally from a Sierra Club paid staffer who was working with ex-NYC Mayor Mike Bloomberg’s money to make me look like a more attractive proletarian. :)” Did he encourage you to shower, shave, and get a haircut too? I loved the whole concept of “occupy”, but the members I met in DC while riding my bike were “unattractive” in the visual and olfactory aesthetic sense and damn hard to talk to because of their lack of focus and naivete. I will say that they had it much more “together” than the World Bank protesters of several years berfore—I often sat on a bench with some of them and asked them what they were protesting—their replies made omnologos sound like a genius.


    • Ray – Here is the coal industry connection –

      http://www.npr.org/2012/02/02/146099048/when-a-windfall-isnt-quite-what-it-seems

      Its in the comments section:
      Lisa Linowes (credited as technical advisor in this movie) and Glenn Schleede (credited under special thanks in this movie) may try to masquerade as regular folks who are just trying to help people, but their agenda – as put forth in this movie – is to demonize wind power.

      Glenn Schleede, former Vice President of the National Coal Association, has lobbied on behalf of the coal industry for years. Did he hoodwink you into believing coal industry lies?

      Lisa Linowes has been tied to both the tea party (via her husband) and the koch brothers (as exposed in the sierra clubs investigation). Her ‘facts’ have been debunked far and wide.

      Thats pretty specific and clear.
      As to the Vimeo video I provided, I don’t think it has the backing of any powerful interests. I can appreciate your feelings for local communities in opposition to powerful faraway interests. Thing is, there are choices to be made and they cannot be avoided. To all of the made in Wall Street decisions, I say, yes, let these people make some decisions for themselves. But don’t be fooled for a minute about whose interests the anti-wind video represents and how close they are to the film. The optimal situation is a community involvement like in Germany. However, in the US, I find that locals are NIMBY everything. But there are choices that must be made. Wind or a uranium mine. Fracking or solar? The question cannot be dodged. This movie does nothing to face those real world problems, instead it creates a false picture of wind towers falling over and burning and people getting sick. Can wind be done wrong? Certainly. Is that the reality everywhere? Not by a mile. Thats what the vimeo video speaks to. Do I find some forms and implementations of wind better than others? You bet. But lets be careful in our discernment and use the same critical thinking to realize that wind is not a panacea, but a real world phenomena, that must be judged on a relative, not absolute, basis. We only have real world choices, we will never have ideal ones. Utopia does not even exist in the future. But our choices will. I am not into absolutes and extremes. I want a real future world that we can live in, warts and all. And I have been doing nothing but researching pragmatic, practical solutions for decades only to find political will against it. There still is an entrenched will against such solutions, but the alternative energy solutions are now entering a realm where their practicality cannot be denied.

  5. jimbills Says:

    Put simply, the economy is an engine to extract resources from nature and give it to humans (utilizing labor and technology). This engine requires energy, and the larger the economy, the more energy it needs.

    All forms of human-created energy powering the economy affect the environment. We are taking from nature in the form of resources and outputting its flip side, environmental degradation/pollution.

    The first question we should ask is if the current economy (or a growing economy) is sustainable in the long run. As no one is really asking that, though, the second question (a far inferior one, imo) would be what are the worst offenders in resource extraction/pollution. Tied with this are what are the worst offenders in terms of human misery.

    When comparing wind or solar to fossil fuels, there really isn’t a contest as to which causes more resource extraction and pollution issues. There isn’t a contest as to which causes greater levels of human misery.

    ‘Windfall’ is basically about people bitching about property values and talking about the noise. Well, ‘Gasland’ seemed a lot more drastic to me. The devastation in West Virginia is kind of a bigger deal, too. The train crashes of fracked oil, the Gulf spill, constant pipeline ruptures, etc. etc. seem like an abnormally larger effect than noise on wind farms. On resource extraction, many turbines can eventually be recycled, but once a fossil fuel is consumed, it’s gone.

    Peter has addressed turbine noise often here. They’re not noiseless, no matter how they’re pitched. But compare that to the cancer rates near coal plants:

    http://www.cnn.com/2012/03/31/us/georgia-coal-power/

    Compare a nation powered with wind turbines to a nation powered with fossil fuels in terms of climate change and ocean acidification.

    My first choice would be to drastically cut any and all energy/resource use as much as possible (more than just buying LEDs and new refrigerators), but I think I’m 1 in 100,000 on that. I think we’re insane not to consider it. But barring that, replacement is the only other alternative.

    Or, we can pretend nothing is wrong and moan about how turbines spoil the view and affect our property values while species go extinct around us and the tide rolls in.

    • jimbills Says:

      Related:

      http://ramblingsdc.net/wtnoise.html

      There are definitely those who stand to gain financially from wind power. The same can be said of any economic activity.

    • rayduray Says:

      Hi Jim,

      Re: “‘Windfall’ is basically about people bitching about property values and talking about the noise.”

      Gosh, how disappointing to read how callous your level of concern is for fellow humans. As Roger Ebert pointed out, there’s a whole lot of aesthetic values and a major sense of well-being that was at stake in Meredith, NY. There was three centuries of history of a region that made its way on once sustainable (and then not so sustainably uneconomic) agriculture that was about to be transformed into an industrial zone benefiting substantively only a handful of absentee financiers. What seemed to me to be at stake was a swindle of the 99% for the sake of a very clever absentee 1%. A 1% who are basically swindlers taking advantage of perverted and corrupted tax law and corporate veils.

      You seem to be endorsing a sort of financial imperialism wherein the peons of Meredith are to be treated as third world peasants for the sake of your abstractions regarding the nation’s energy gluttony.

      Perhaps you didn’t watch the documentary. Perhaps you didn’t understand the devastation of Tug Hill versus the fact that other richer communities in the Catskills were able to outlaw the wind turbines outright. Perhaps you fail to understand the human costs of imposing an industrial nightmare on a community that simply wasn’t to be advantaged by its own degradation.

      Or perhaps you’re from Texas where there’s more land to ruin before it has
      a terrible impact on the neighbors. :)

      ***
      I am in favor of the development of wind power, where it is appropriate. I think the London Array is brilliant. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/London_Array I think there should be a massive investment in wind power off the West Coast of the U.S. In particular, the coast of Oregon has great potential for wind power. The same thing applies to much of the Coast Range on the West Coast where there’s plenty of wind and not many people. But putting industrial wind arrays in bucolic villages and parklands seems to me to be a sign of a people who have lost any sense of how to live a decent existence.

      ***
      You wrote: “This engine requires energy, and the larger the economy, the more energy it needs. “

      This quite simply is not true. Ever since the mid-1970s oil shocks the United States economy has nearly doubled while the amount of energy expended per unit of GDP has fallen. See: http://www.economist.com/blogs/dailychart/2011/01/energy_use

      • jimbills Says:

        I’m fully aware of wind’s shortfalls, and I’m fully aware of Wall Street finagling. But you’re dodging the point. I agree that all forms of energy are destructive. I’m saying that in regards to wind energy, it doesn’t compare in scale to the devastation of fossil fuels.

        I rather wish we all had to deal with wind turbine noise if it meant we kicked out all fossil fuels. We might think twice about how much energy is really needed as a side benefit.

        uknow is right – wind energy’s great obstacle is NIMBYism. Fine, people don’t like the noise, the view, and the property value, but that ‘sustainable’ community was getting their power from somewhere, and I can guarantee that there were other humans affected by that. They just weren’t in ‘Windfall’.

        I know you – the film affected you strongly because of the Wall Street angle. You don’t think we’re getting raped right now by the oil, coal, and natural gas industries? By any other big business concerns? I agree that capitalism is a nightmare regarding the environment and human rights, but it’s beside the point. It’s not like Meredith got their co-op and suddenly the noise and property values were okay.

        On the film’s message itself, people should know that no source of power is flawless. They should know that Wall Street is screwing with us. But the message that wind power is horrible and devastates little farming communities ALSO contributes to the status quo.

        On Texas, wow, I’d 100x times prefer we have wind turbines in every town than entire regions being covered with air pollution from fracking:

        http://ecowatch.com/2012/04/03/gas-industry-spin-cant-cover-up-problems-caused-by-fracking/

        But again, I’d 100x more prefer we all just slashed our energy and resource consumption than have wind turbines in every town.

        “This quite simply is not true. Ever since the mid-1970s oil shocks the United States economy has nearly doubled while the amount of energy expended per unit of GDP has fallen.”

        Mmm. We can also look at per-capita energy use, which has been basically flat since the 1970s. Then again, so have inflation-adjusted median wages. Or, we could look at this chart:

        http://www.eia.gov/todayinenergy/detail.cfm?id=11951&src=Total-b1


        • Its a coal industry hack film, full of unbalanced perspective. Contrast this view of wind power with

          Coal and other interests falsely hold wind power to a higher standard than other energy sources. Witness the incredible bird kill situation, with every other source of energy causing more kills, but wind focused on it excessively. Energy choices must be made. Unfortunately, there are some stupid enough to want to believe that whatever they are not aware of is great. They are exactly the sheeple this propaganda movie is intended to target.

        • rayduray Says:

          Hi Jim,

          Thanks for the insightful article by Paul Gallay regarding air pollution in Texas. I was not aware of the extent to which Dallas/Ft. Worth is being subjected to the undesirable and seemingly intractable mess the fracking industry is creating. No wonder Dick Cheney didn’t want his friends to be regulated. Sheesh.

          ***
          As far as NIMBYism is concerned, I have to admit to vacillating on the matter. Some days I recall that I made my living building things. Then when I read about fracking pollution or ill-advised wind plant siting, I sometimes take to BANANAism. That is to say “Build Absolutely Nothing Anywhere Near Anybody!”

        • rayduray Says:

          Christopher,

          Re: “Its a coal industry hack film, full of unbalanced perspective. Contrast this view of wind power with http://vimeo.com/63965931

          As the saying goes, one man’s ceiling is another man’s floor. Of course this makes sense to the songwriter Paul Simon because he’s from New York City.

          It makes a heck of a lot less sense to the people who live with hardly any background noise at all in Meredith, NY.

          So, I hate to say it, but I found your Vimeo video creepily propagandistic and reminiscent of the crap fed to us by the industry described in John Stauber’s classic “Toxic Sludge Is Good For You”. http://tinyurl.com/kxzp59v

          Whoever that young woman was in the Vimeo video, she’s highly atypical as far as I’m concerned and very likely is paid shill (Amateurs use YouTube, not Vimeo). Here’s what women her age are far more likely to concern themselves with: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-25962930

          In contrast, I still find “Windfall” to be a true expression of a community attempting to control its own destiny.

          • dumboldguy Says:

            Ray,

            I’m having a hard time figuring out where you really stand. Coal is bad but wind is too? Because the Wall Streeters are pushing it on the poor greedy folk in Meredith who made some bad decisions and allowed turbines literally in their backyards and are now feeling some remorse?

            http://vimeo.com/63965931 ” is “CREEPILY propagandist”? What is so “creepy” about that piece? Until someone replicates it and finds that they fudged their numbers, it’s just a nice counter to the “other side”. I actually found it to be rather “pleasant” and non-creepy, but I’m just a dumboldguy so what do I know.

            So, I hate to say it, but I am finding some of your postings to be “creepily propagandistic” and reminiscent of the crap fed to us by the the daveburtons of the world—-distracting, disruptive, and off topic—-like what you posted here about someone’s TONGUE as a counter to a video on wind turbines, which video may not be amateur, but is certainly not the hack job that so many of us see Windfall to be (but you strangely don’t).

            PS Waiting to hear your retraction of your comments about Michael Brune of the Sierra Club and the $26 million in natural gas money. It appears that you were wrong—-do you ever admit to that?

        • rayduray Says:

          Christopher,

          Christopher,

          Re: “Its a coal industry hack film, full of unbalanced perspective. Contrast this view of wind power with vimeo,com/63965931 ”

          As the saying goes, one man’s ceiling is another man’s floor. Of course this makes sense to the songwriter Paul Simon because he’s from New York City.

          It makes a heck of a lot less sense to the people who live with hardly any background noise at all in Meredith, NY.

          So, I hate to say it, but I found your Vimeo video creepily propagandistic and reminiscent of the crap fed to us by the industry described in John Stauber’s classic “Toxic Sludge Is Good For You”. http://tinyurl.com/kxzp59v

          Whoever that young woman was in the Vimeo video, she’s highly atypical as far as I’m concerned and very likely is paid shill (Amateurs use YouTube, not Vimeo). Here’s what women her age are far more likely to concern themselves with: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-latin-america-25962930

          In contrast, I still find “Windfall” to be a true expression of a community attempting to control its own destiny.


      • Don’t let your cynicism get the better of you. You might wind up voting for Nader and getting Bush instead. You need to become aware of who is manipulating you and how and why. I really do want to hear more about the salmon. Can you post some particulars? Links? Bad wind suppliers need to be rooted out. Nobody needs that. On the vimeo post, I am surprised you did not realize the source was one vetted by Peter an posted several time by him. Its from Craig Morris, who is a passionate environmentalist with a small translation business called Petite Planete. I could not say for sure, but I suspect the girl is his daughter. Regardless, the content is real and there is no need for interpretation. The sound you hear is what you get. Your extreme reaction to the source is unjustified from what I can discern. I don’t have any direct information, but from what I can tell, there is some similarity to Peter. He is a guy trying to get the word out, and has very little in common with Donald Trump.

        http://climatecrocks.com/2013/11/13/welcome-to-energiewende-a-series/

        You are good at researching the internet. You won’t have any trouble finding Craig Morris and Energiewende.


    • Yes. I always find your comments appealing because sustainability seems to be last on the list. We would not be in a CAGW position in the first place if it had been foremost on our minds. Instead, we have Obama SOTU arguing for more growth. Its a dead end that is approaching faster and faster. So many cues, yet so little understanding the big picture. I hope you become one among the many who realize the big picture is find a way to live long term, not just grow and hope resources are infinite.


  6. Its a well made windbagger film based on anecdotes and a severely myopic and selfish worldview. Even if wind turbines were as bad as these NIMBYists would have you believe, fossil fuels will ultimately be much much much worse for everyone…..everywhere….in the world.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      I have put Windfall on the top of my Netflix queue, but a look at the trailer and reading Ebert’s review lead me to the same conclusions as uknow. I contrast it with the video on the impact of wind farms in Australia, which was well balanced and showed some folks who had done their homework.

      Some of my fondest memories of my time living in NJ are fishing trips for trout in the legendary trout rivers of the Catskills. I caught my biggest brown trout in the East Branch of the Delaware in Delaware County, which is where Meredith is located. Can’t recall exactly where Meredith is, but the area has many very nice small towns, and although the folks may not be rich, their poverty rate is way lower than in Appalachia, and the area appears “prosperous” in comparison. It’s a shame they got sucked into a mess, but the pictures of wind turbines looming so closely
      over farm buildings makes me ask “Whatever were they thinking?”.

      I have driven across TX and seen wind farms that stretched for tens of miles, with hardly any other evidence of humans in sight. Too many of the folks in Meredith made some bad decisions, and now they have an uncomfortable bed to sleep in.

  7. Gingerbaker Says:

    Hey Ray

    Have you ever made a post here at Crocks that wasn’t off topic?

    Just wondering what conversation you are going to derail next. Maybe you can provide us a schedule, a kind of TV Guide, so we can tune in later for a topic you want to talk about?

    Jesus Fracking Christ.

    • dumboldguy Says:

      Jesus Fracking Christ indeed. Although Ray perhaps HAS dragged us WAY off topic, we all knew that it was way too warm in Alaska and way too cold in the Midwest and East, and that fact has been covered nicely in other Crock posts. Because of that, this post might have gotten only 4 or 5 comments, but instead we got into an interesting thing with wind power, and the “ten course catastrophe” was exciting stuff.

      Since I’m a train buff and model railroader, I found the tank car clip pretty interesting myself. There were ~100 tank cars in that train, and they looked to be the D-111 type that ruptures so easily in derailments. They hold about 30,000+ gallons each, so we watched over 3 million gallons go by in 2-1/2 minutes, a little faster than Ray’s “a million a minute”. Looking at the proximity to the river and the speed at which the train was moving (pretty fast) made me glad it wasn’t the Potomac River (from which I get my drinking water).

      • Gingerbaker Says:

        Perhaps there are some other shiny things Ray could post to distract you from what you consider to be a boring post. Glad you like them.

        But being here the past year, it seems to me like Ray has has an obsession with derailing every topic and discussion that he enters. What percentage of the time has Ray been on topic would you hazard? It’s pretty selfish, imo

        I don’t necessarily mind WHAT Ray likes to share with us (altho today’s anti wind propaganda trailer was pretty shitty), it’s WHEN he does it. As in:

        All. The. Fracking. Time.

        • dumboldguy Says:

          Gotcha. I’m relatively new to Crock, and “unnamed others” have worn on me far more than Ray—at least his “stuff” can be counted on to be true, even though it is very often off-topic. Ray, are you listening? Are you really deliberately trying to “derail” us?

          And I never find any posts on Crock to be “boring”, although some folks apparently do, since some posts just don’t take off and attract much interest. I am a guy who likes vusuals, and I had already seen the two clips on NASA Earth Observatory—-they were just as good the second time around.

          I myself like the various little “corners” that commenters on Crock lead us into, particularly the ones from abroad and the ones that give personal insights. To me, that’s what makes Crock so much more “fun” than SkS, for instance.


      • I just heard from a libertarian tonight that danced to the chemtrails and GW is a government conspiracy tune. Totally ungrounded stuff. But you cannot stop ungrounded people from believing fairy tales. I draw the line where stuff has consequences in the real world. While I believe a corporate connection to wind brings all the ills of capitalism, and why wouldn’t wind have as many evil or good humanity as the rest of life, I cannot help being disgusted by people who are irresponsible about their choices. I actually encountered a sentiment that said,
        ” I don’t want to know anything about power. I want it to be automatic and out of mind and sight.” Nice idea. As I age, I have less sympathy for the “I want my cake and eat it, too” mentality. I read about potholer54 s decision to start his blog. He said he was just tired of people having drunken barroom opinion flings. He thought it might be better if there was reason and critical thinking. I will second that opinion.


  8. […] Alaska is lukewarm slush. The arctic is anomalously warm as a whole.  Slovenia, in central Europe is, uhhh…hmmm. […]


  9. The best rebuttal to this movie is comments on other blog sites.

    http://www.npr.org/2012/02/02/146099048/when-a-windfall-isnt-quite-what-it-seems

    Where Windfall fails miserably is in providing facts and reality. Instead, it supports the disinformation campaign of the anti-wind lobby, regurgitating the kitchen-sink arguments favoured by them.

    Don’t windFALL for this coal lobby propaganda.

    Lisa Linowes (credited as technical advisor in this movie) and Glenn Schleede (credited under special thanks in this movie) may try to masquerade as regular folks who are just trying to help people, but their agenda – as put forth in this movie – is to demonize wind power.

    Glenn Schleede, former Vice President of the National Coal Association, has lobbied on behalf of the coal industry for years. Did he hoodwink you into believing coal industry lies?

    Lisa Linowes has been tied to both the tea party (via her husband) and the koch brothers (as exposed in the sierra clubs investigation). Her ‘facts’ have been debunked far and wide.


  10. Yes, it is soggy in Alaska. Apologies to those freezing in the East US and Eastern Europe. Its AGW and weird weather, not chemtrails and government conspiracy.
    Now. Everyone wants to talk about wind out of turn and I just did my bit to be on topic. While there is still some attention to it, read this article about the difference between intermittent and variable. I have been noticing for some time how particularly vulnerable large thermal PP, coal, nuclear, are to weather extremes. When the weather increases electricity demand, they are most likely to be off line. Peter mentioned water and heat taking them offline. Here is more from Craig Morris.

    http://energytransition.de/2014/01/intermittent-or-variable/


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