Satellite view, October 12, 2013. Nothing to See here, move along..

October 13, 2013

Hat tip to Planet3.

Three large tropical cyclones blast Asia.

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28 Responses to “Satellite view, October 12, 2013. Nothing to See here, move along..”

  1. omnologos Says:

    Is this what you took back from Reykjavik? Shall we juxtapose pictures of the 2013 Atlantic hurricane season?

    Where’s the science? Say, what’s ACE doing at the moment?

    • dumboldguy Says:

      What is ACE doing at the moment, O-log asks? Of course it’s trending below normal YTD, or O-log wouldn’t have brought it up.

      Why can’t we just look at an excellent photograph of a seldom seen event and enjoy it? It is WAY more interesting than the one O-log references from March 2010 that shows only TWO storms.

      (been to the Jersey shore lately O-log?)

      • omnologos Says:

        dumb – this blog is about climate. What ACE is doing YTD is of mildly passing interest, btw. We should be looking at what ACE has been doing for the past few decades (“the moment”, in climatological terms).

        And the “nothing to see here” reference made it clear this post is not about “an excellent photograph of a seldom seen event”.

        • dumboldguy Says:

          I’m afraid O-log is talking to us in “Duchess Speak” again—Alice would not approve.

          O-Log asks “What’s ACE doing at the moment?” and then states “What ACE is doing YTD is of mildly passing interest”? Why did you bring up ACE in the first place, O-Log? As a very convoluted connection to the 2013 “hurricane season that almost never was” (but isn’t quite over yet)?

          Of course this is a blog about “climate” (more specifically climate CHANGE and climate change denial), and of course this particular post is just a “throwaway” in terms of its greater significance.

          I suspect Peter put it up because it WAS an excellent photograph and would provoke some thought. My first thought was “nice pic, and let’s hope that we don’t start seeing pics with four or five storms visible at one time, and that they aren’t twice as big”.


        • You can’t swing a dead cat without hitting a “seldom seen event”.

          • MorinMoss Says:

            After Omno’s experiment with flying turkeys, let’s not give him any more ideas involving mammals. Who knows where that will lead.

          • omnologos Says:

            Turkeys are all yours MorinMoss

          • MorinMoss Says:

            You keep ‘em. I’ll take the cats.

          • dumboldguy Says:

            Perhaps O-Log will add “swinging dead cats increasingly hitting seldom seen events” (as well as something about flying turkeys) to his argument ad providentiam list.

            He will then get closer to the 100 items on the list needed for its proper posting (on a tree in the center of some impenetrable forest surrounded by a swamp, perhaps?).

            I’m sure the dead horses on the AAP list (many of them so dead they never lived) are probably tired of being beaten and would enjoy having some other critters draw attention away from them.

  2. skeptictmac57 Says:

    Gee,I wonder where all of that energy came from?
    A real head-scratcher.

  3. cetude Says:

    “There ain’t no such thang as climate change or global warming! .. thanks for calling” …. Senator James Inhofe .


  4. hmmm, could it be that energy imbalance equal to 400,000 Hiroshima bombs per day?

  5. omnologos Says:

    A year ago (Oct 16):

    inthecloudhead.blogspot.co.uk/2012/10/storms-of-world.html

    March 2010:

    http://www.flickr.com/photos/gsfc/4441776230/

    August 2006:

    en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Typhoon_saomai_060807.jpg


    • Yes both of these in the warmest decade ever recorded. What was your point again?

    • MorinMoss Says:

      Good finds, and as already pointed out, within the last few years.
      Got any from previous decades, when the global avg temp was colder?

      Also, when it comes to storms, size does matter.
      Typhoon Saomai and its siblings would comfortably fit inside Phailin with a couple hundred klicks to spare.

      • omnologos Says:

        I shall see if I find any satellite pictures from the 1930s. Oh, wait…perhaps I’ll build a model and simulate them instead. Oh, wait…

        ps if size does matter, is there any indication storms are getting bigger in diametric terms?

        • MorinMoss Says:

          I’m sure you’ll find the answer to that question while you figure out when satellites started to used for imaging.
          Happy hunting.
          Which reminds me – gotta go find a turkey.

          Happy Thanksgiving.

        • redskylite Says:

          Weather satellites were in operation in the early 1960’s when CO2 concentration was around 320 ppm (in May), now in May 2013 CO2 was 400 ppm (next year it will be around 402.something. Methane concentration was around 1530ppm in 1978, it is now somewhere around 1800 ppm. I think the satellite results from the last 50 years are very meaningful and must be taken very seriously as they have been captured during the sharp rise of the hockey stick. Of course trends have been effected by ENSO/PMO/AMO, Solar Variation etc. – but the GHG warming atmosphere principle still holds true. The observed measurements of the past 5 decades are very meaningful. Look to NOAA and NASA for the data. Positive move from India (who emitted just under 6% of world’s co2 in 2008)

          http://asian-power.com/project/news/oil-india-diversifies-renewable-energy


  6. There’s been an ongoing debate about whether increased wind shear decreases the raw capability of additional thermal energy to fuel cyclones.

    http://www.wunderground.com/education/shear.asp

  7. climatebob Says:

    the USA and Atlantic have had a very quiet hurricane year and it seems to me that the Pacific and Indian ocean has had a busy year. It would be more interesting to see a World wide report of hurricane/cyclone events. If this map of the cyclones was one of hurricanes approaching the USA there would be some consternation. Perhaps next year?

    • omnologos Says:

      talking of the USA a lot of interesting past pics of hurricanes is now hidden behind the shutdown

      • MorinMoss Says:

        You may be able to get some of them from Wikipedia, out of Google’s cache or from the Wayback Machine.
        I doubt that any piecemeal funding from the GOP will cover NOAA or NASA so those pages will be offline until the government fiasco is over.

        And if the League of Extraordinary Idiots that has taken over the GOP manages to trigger a debt default, then all bets are off.


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