A Renewable New York State

March 14, 2013

nystate

In January I posted on a University of Delaware study showing how a key, energy intensive region of the country could be run entirely on renewable energy.

Now we have a new study from Mark Jacobson and his team at Stanford, visualizing a renewable future for New York State.  Forming an idea of what this will look like is the first step in bringing it to reality.

Abstract

This study analyzes a plan to convert New York State’s (NYS’s) all-purpose (for electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, industry) energy infrastructure to one derived entirely from wind, water, and sunlight (WWS) generating electricity and electrolytic hydrogen. Under the plan, NYS’s 2030 all-purpose end-use power would be provided by

10% onshore wind (4020 5-MW turbines),
40% offshore wind (12,700 5-MW turbines),
10% concentrated solar (387 100-MW plants),
10% solar-PV plants (828 50-MW plants),
6% residential rooftop PV (~5 million 5-kW systems),
12% commercial/government rooftop PV (~500,000 100-kW systems),
5% geothermal (36 100-MW plants), 0.5% wave (1910 0.75-MW devices),
1% tidal (2600 1-MW turbines),
and 5.5% hydroelectric (6.6 1300-MW plants, -
of which 89% exist).

The conversion would reduce NYS’s end-use power demand ~37% and stabilize energy prices since fuel costs would be zero. It would create more jobs than lost because nearly all NYS energy would now be produced in- state. NYS air pollution mortality and its costs would decline by ~4000 (1200-7600) deaths/yr, and $33 (10-76) billion/yr (3% of 2010 NYS GDP), respectively, alone repaying the 271 GW installed power needed within ~17 y, before accounting for electricity sales. NYS’s own emission decreases would reduce 2050 U.S. climate costs by ~$3.2 billion/yr.

-

An important concern to address in a clean-energy economy is whether electric power demand can be met with WWS (water, wind,solar) supply on a minutely, daily, and seasonal basis. Previous work has described multiple methods to match renewable energy supply with demand and to smooth out the variability of WWS resources (Delucchi and Jacobson, 2011). Such methods include

(A) combining geographically-dispersed WWS resources as a bundled set of resources rather than separate resources and using hydroelectric or stored concentrated solar power to balance the remaining load;

(B) using demand-response management to shift times of demand to better match the availability of WWS power;

(C) over-sizing WWS peak generation capacity to minimize the times when available WWS power is less than demand and provide power to produce heat for air and water and hydrogen for transportation and heat when WWS power exceeds demand;

(D) integrating weather forecasts into system operation;

(E) storing energy in batteries or other storage media at the site of generation or use; and

(F) storing energy in electric-vehicle batteries for later extraction (vehicle-to-grid).

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4 Responses to “A Renewable New York State”


  1. [...] This study analyzes a plan to convert New York State’s (NYS’s) all-purpose (for electricity, transportation, heating/cooling, industry) energy infrastructure to one derived entirely from wind, water, and sunlight (WWS) generating electricity and electrolytic hydrogen. Under the plan, NYS’s 2030 all-purpose end-use power would be provided by 10% onshore wind (4020 5-MW turbines), 40% offshore wind (12,700 5-MW turbines), 10% concentrated solar (387 100-MW plants), 10% solar-PV plants (828 50-MW plants), 6% residential rooftop PV (~5 million 5-kW systems), 12% commercial/government rooftop PV (~500,000 100-kW systems), 5% geothermal (36 100-MW plants), 0.5% wave (1910 0.75-MW devices), 1% tidal (2600 1-MW turbines), and 5.5% hydroelectric (6.6 1300-MW plants, – of which 89% exist). The conversion would reduce NYS’s end-use power demand ~37% and stabilize energy prices since fuel costs would be zero. It would create more jobs than lost because nearly all NYS energy would now be produced in- state.  [...]

  2. Bruce Miller Says:

    Low power sources, Solar Wind, Wave, Hydro, Tidal, Geothermal Biological and Chemical as this is, are all domestic, clean, waste free, radioactive free, renewable = perpetual = eternal strengths at the very base of a nation. Be very careful with negativity – remember always: China has fathered the true Nuclear Age for mankind with their clean, waste free Thorium LFTR designs to debut in 2017, (see U-tube videos) and these will “Alter Global Energy Maps Forever” – even reducing the value of the U.S. Petro-Dollar monopoly on oil energy and until now world energy? Time now for America to “hit the books”? Play “catch-up”? Hardly likely: The Asian intelligentsia pool currently exceeds the Western World pool by over a thousand fold, is growing vigorously, and is fed riches at an astounding rate – far in excess of the corporate contributions in the West, and pure science, not ‘cash’ motivated for immediate ROI? You cannot afford the time wasted in negativity – you must seek positive solutions and you must realize that intelligence is universal not an American monopoly? Good luck University of Delaware!
    P.S. See Threos from China – car of the future? pulsed D.C. drives? Inductive returns?

    nano carbon super capacitors :
    “”The new device has a specific energy density of 85.6 Wh/kg at room temperature and 136 Wh/kg at 80 °C. These are the highest ever values for “electric double layer” super capacitors based on carbon nanomaterials.””
    Newer ones approach or even exceed the “Energy Density” figures for gasoline! They recharge indefinitely!
    Here we have the ability to accumulate and discharge at will, as pulsed D.C. any amount we please, without “internal resistance” loses of batteries and return by inductive coil as desired. – Willo improve the efficiencies of all these systems in astoulding fashion as more and more vehicles using this energy storage system add “ballast” and smooth the peaks and vallies of production of electrical energy!


  3. [...] one fifth of the US grid. I tried to summarize a few key points from the New York State study with help from Peter [...]

  4. petersjazz Says:

    I guess end-user efficiency could be even more. Heat pumps that make energy from air, water or the ground can play a big role. And storing heat water from summer to winter.


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