“CO2 is Plant Food” – New Paper Further Refutes Sixth Grade Science

August 18, 2010

A paper published at about the same moment as I was uploading my latest video, (“The CO2 is Plant Food Crock“) further nails down the case.

A team from the University of Guelph has determined that Trees are soaking up less carbon than expected given the increase in atmospheric CO2. ¬†According to the press release, “Scientists and policy-makers hoping to use forests to naturally soak up increasing amounts of carbon dioxide may have overestimated the role of trees as carbon sink”.

“Contrary to expectations, tree growth has declined over the past century despite rising amounts of CO2 in the atmosphere, said Madhur Anand, a professor in Guelph’s School of Environmental Sciences.”

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3 Responses to ““CO2 is Plant Food” – New Paper Further Refutes Sixth Grade Science”

  1. indulisb Says:

    “As carbon dioxide increases in the atmosphere, plants become more efficient at producing their food and chemical requirements. They can allocate more resources for defence against pests. This is good for the plants but bad for the animals that eat them. Plants produce more toxins such as cyanide and it is thought the chemical composition of some leaves may make them unsuitable for animals which once relied on them as food. Protein is reduced and animals need to eat more leaves to maintain their level of proteins. Ros Gleadow warns that changing the composition of the atmosphere has broader consequences than just climate change. There are direct effects on plants, some of which don’t grow so well under increased atmospheric carbon dioxide.”

    Also, cyandide has more effect if you ingest it with less protein, so double lose with this effect of the wonderful CO2 “plant food”.

    http://www.abc.net.au/rn/scienceshow/stories/2010/2943500.htm

  2. greenman3610 Says:

    one helpful commenter on the you tube site suggested that we’ll just do research on edible cacti and simply adapt.

  3. Michael Searcy Says:

    NASA has posted a new video that discusses the decrease in plant productivity.


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